Video Interview – Rob Rogers – Part 2

Great messages for medical students, interns and new EM residents!

Are you ready to meet the genuine people behind the professional?

iEM team proudly presents the ICON360 project. In this pleasantly educational series, world-renowned experts will share their habits, give advice on life, wellness and the profession.

Our guest is Dr. Rob Rogers.

Trained in Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine, Rob Rogers currently practices Emergency Medicine at the University of Kentucky’s Chandler Hospital in the Department of Emergency Medicine. An innovative medical educator on the cutting edge of creativity, he shares his knowledge on the monthly medical education Medutopia Podcast. Rob co-founded The Teaching Institute and in 2014 created The Teaching Course at The University of Maryland. As a passionate medical education enthusiast, podcast evangelist, learning choreographer, and entrepreneur, Rob works tirelessly to change the world of medical education by reinventing it.

The full interview is 24 minutes long and includes many advice on life, wellness, and our profession. We will be sharing short videos from this interview. However, the full interview will be published as an audio file in our Soundcloud account. 

This interview was recorded during the EACEM2018 in Turkey. We thank EMAT.

Arif Alper Cevik

Elif Dilek Cakal

Murat Cetin

Cite this article as: iEM Education Project Team, "Video Interview – Rob Rogers – Part 2," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, March 25, 2019, https://iem-student.org/2019/03/25/video-interview-rob-rogers-part-2/, date accessed: November 18, 2019

iEM in Mexico!

Mexico is one of the leading countries which using the iEM platform in 2018 and 2019. Therefore, iEM is invited to the 30th conference of Emergency Medicine Society of Mexico to present iEM Education Project.

The conference is held in Cancun/Mexico from 18th to 22nd March. You can follow the conference from twitter with #CIMU2019. There are around 2000 attendees from Mexico and Latin American countries.

Currently, we have 143 contributors around the globe (19 countries), and Central and South American contributors are 8 out of those (5.6%).

We are so grateful to Jesus Daniel Lopez Tapia, Sociedad Mexicana De Medicina De Emergencia A.C., and its leaders for their support.

Dr. Jesus Daniel Lopez Tapia

Drs Gonzalo Camargo (Argentina), Arif Alper Cevik (Turkey/UAE), Edgardo Menendez (Argentina), Eric Revue (France), Jesus Daniel Lopez Tapia (Mexico).

We are looking for more collaboration and contribution from this part of the world which has amazing emergency medicine experience. If you are living in this region and feeling responsible for promoting emergency medicine and providing free educational resources for medical students/interns and educators, please contact with us, be a contributor for this international, non-profit project endorsed by International Federation for Emergency Medicine.

If you are living in this region and feeling responsible for promoting emergency medicine and providing free educational resources for medical students/interns and educators...

Contact With Us!

Cite this article as: iEM Education Project Team, "iEM in Mexico!," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, March 20, 2019, https://iem-student.org/2019/03/20/iem-in-mexico/, date accessed: November 18, 2019

Video Interview – Rob Rogers – Part 1

Great messages for medical students, interns and new EM residents!

Are you ready to meet the genuine people behind the professional?

iEM team proudly presents the ICON360 project. In this pleasantly educational series, world-renowned experts will share their habits, give advice on life, wellness and the profession.

Our guest is Dr. Rob Rogers.

Trained in Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine, Rob Rogers currently practices Emergency Medicine at the University of Kentucky’s Chandler Hospital in the Department of Emergency Medicine. An innovative medical educator on the cutting edge of creativity, he shares his knowledge on the monthly medical education Medutopia Podcast. Rob co-founded The Teaching Institute and in 2014 created The Teaching Course at The University of Maryland. As a passionate medical education enthusiast, podcast evangelist, learning choreographer, and entrepreneur, Rob works tirelessly to change the world of medical education by reinventing it.

The full interview is 24 minutes long and includes many advice on life, wellness, and our profession. We will be sharing short videos from this interview. However, the full interview will be published as an audio file in our Soundcloud account. 

This interview was recorded during the EACEM2018 in Turkey. We thank EMAT.

The interview was recorded and produced by

Arif Alper Cevik

Elif Dilek Cakal

Murat Cetin

Cite this article as: iEM Education Project Team, "Video Interview – Rob Rogers – Part 1," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, March 18, 2019, https://iem-student.org/2019/03/18/video-interview-rob-rogers-part-1/, date accessed: November 18, 2019

Video Interview: Tracy Sanson – Part 2

Are you ready to meet the genuine people behind the professional?

iEM team proudly presents the ICON360 project. In this pleasantly educational series, world-renowned experts will share their habits, give advice on life, wellness and the profession.

Our guest is Dr. Tracy Sanson.

Dr. Sanson is a practicing Emergency Physician. She is a consultant and educator on Leadership development and Medical education and Co-Chief Editor of the Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock; an Emergency Medicine international journal.

Part 2

The full interview is 10 minutes long and includes many advice on life, wellness, and our profession. We will be sharing short videos from this interview. However, the full interview was published as an audio file in our Soundcloud account. 

This interview was recorded during the EACEM2018 in Turkey. We thank EMAT.

The interview was recorded and produced by

Arif Alper Cevik

Elif Dilek Cakal

Murat Cetin

44% Female Contributors in iEM

62 out of 142 contributors are female professionals.

iEM Education Project

We have 62 female contributors (emergency medicine doctor, resident, intern, medical student) out of 142. This is 44%, and we need more. Please share with your colleagues, students. We need you!

How to be a contributor!

Video Interview: Tracy Sanson – Part 1

Are you ready to meet the genuine people behind the professional?

iEM team proudly presents the ICON360 project. In this pleasantly educational series, world-renowned experts will share their habits, give advice on life, wellness and the profession.

Our guest is Dr. Tracy Sanson.

Dr. Sanson is a practicing Emergency Physician. She is a consultant and educator on Leadership development and Medical education and Co-Chief Editor of the Journal of Emergencies, Trauma and Shock; an Emergency Medicine international journal.

Part 1

The full interview is 10 minutes long and includes many advice on life, wellness, and our profession. We will be sharing short videos from this interview. However, the full interview was published as an audio file in our Soundcloud account. 

This interview was recorded during the EACEM2018 in Turkey. We thank EMAT.

The interview was recorded and produced by

Arif Alper Cevik

Elif Dilek Cakal

Murat Cetin

My Road to Emergency Medicine

Helene Morakis

MS4 at Queen’s School of Medicine

Incoming EM resident at the University of British Columbia

My first shadowing exposure to clinical medicine was in Pediatric Emergency Medicine (EM). Before starting medical school, I lifeguarded during my studies. Over six years, I had sent a handful of children to the Pediatric Emergency Department (ED) and always wondered what happened to them. I expected the shadowing experience to be chaotic and stressful.

The supervising physician shattered all my preconceived stereotypes about emergency medicine: she listened empathetically to patients and their parents, she took the time to teach her timid mob of medical learners and she managed to stay calm while juggling multiple cases of varying acuity. I left that shift – and all of my subsequent adult and peds EM shadowing shifts – in awe. I wanted to be part of this group of skilled physicians that made meaningful short connections with patients and was eager to tackle any case that came through the door.

I wanted to be part of this group of skilled physicians that made meaningful short connections with patients.

While in medical school I found I also loved the collaborative setting, the fast pace and the challenging contrast between cases in EM. My first two EM clerkship shifts entailed performing CPR, providing patient education in English, French and Spanish (and kicking myself for not learning at least three more languages!), ruling out a stroke in a non-verbal patient, and suturing a laceration after an assault. I was hooked. The opportunity to care for patients during their most difficult moments solidified my passion for Emergency Medicine. I love the “anyone, anything, anytime” mantra shared across ED’s that I visited on electives.

The opportunity to care for patients during their most difficult moments solidified my passion.

ANY

One
Thing
Time

EM is a broad and flexible field

Being fascinated by healthcare delivery in diverse settings and motivated by social justice I was interested particularly in Global Health and Wilderness Medicine in my pre-clinical years before dedicating myself to EM. Luckily, EM is a broad and flexible field and allows me to combine all of these interests.

I have been particularly interested in the online community that is working to advance EM and recruit medical students to the growing specialty on an international scale. Learning from and contributing to projects such as iEM is motivating and I am energized by like-minded medical learners around the world. My passion outside of school in the past two years has been working with the International Student Association of Emergency Medicine.

EM community is the best!

I may be biased, but I think the EM community is the best! There is an incredibly dynamic and well-established online presence that I have found very welcoming. Along with learning tips and tricks from FOAMed gurus, I had the opportunity to reflect on the EM mindset and social issues with the FemInEM community. Going to the FemInEM Idea Exchange 2018 (FIX18) conference last year in NYC as a student ambassador was an incredible experience and made me motivated to continue connecting with like-minded EM colleagues online.

Shana Zucker medical student, LGBTQIA+ advocate, at the FIX18 conference presenting her Queericulum

When I’m not in the hospital, I like to play outside. Participating in Wilderness Medicine allows me to do so even more and I like to think about how to deliver healthcare in non-hospital environments. I love that I can continue pursuing this passion through EM. The Wilderness Medical Society (WMS) has conferences, courses and research opportunities for medical students. I am working on my Fellowship of the Academy of Wilderness Medicine (FAWM) and hoping to gain more on the ground experience and contribute to research in this field as I move through my career!

When I’m not in the hospital, I like to play outside.

Hiking King’s Throne in Kluane National Park, YT, Canada, between EM shifts in Whitehorse, YT

The excitement and variety continue after shifts in EM. Between the online medical education community, on-shift teaching, research opportunities, the world of simulation and the interdisciplinary applications of EM, it is a specialty that academically has a lot of opportunities. Shift work is challenging, but offers flexibility to pursue my hobbies outside of work. There is a general culture of work-life integration and promotion of wellness shared among emergency physicians. At my home school program, Queen’s Department of Emergency Medicine, I saw this reflected in the resident and faculty mindsets and it contributed to my own prioritization of my wellness.

EM is a specialty that academically has a lot of opportunities.

The best advice I have received about choosing a specialty has been to follow my passions. The road to EM has been a fun adventure and has given me plenty of opportunities to do so. I am excited to start residency at the University of British Columbia. With teaching opportunities, unique pathology and a high volume of trauma, the residency at Vancouver General Hospital will be a busy but incredible ride.

Vancouver, BC, Canada

I look forward to pursuing my outdoor interests and enjoying urban amenities in Vancouver between shifts. With faculty and resident involvement in Wilderness Medicine and Global EM, I see many fun opportunities lying ahead!

If you liked this story, you may like these too!

Cite this article as: Helene Morakis, "My Road to Emergency Medicine," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, March 6, 2019, https://iem-student.org/2019/03/06/my-road-to-emergency-medicine/, date accessed: November 18, 2019

Interview: Simon Carley

Are you ready to meet the genuine people behind the professional?

iEM team proudly presents the ICON360 project. In this pleasantly educational series, world-renowned experts will share their habits, give advice on life, wellness and the profession.

Our first guest is Dr. Simon Carley.

Simon Carley is Professor of Emergency Medicine in Manchester, England. Along with being an active clinician, he has published over 100 papers in clinical journals. His main interest areas are disaster medicine, diagnostics, evidence base medicine and medical education. He is a co-founder and developer of the BestBets and St. Emlyn’s websites.

Morning Person Or Night Owl?

Oh, Gosh. I am probably a morning person which is not terribly good for an emergency physician. I get up at six o’clock pretty much everyday and I can work into the night but I just like to get up early in the morning and start work, get things done before breakfast and then the rest of the day is your own.

The song that help you relax?

Gosh! To relax? Wait on… Gosh, to relax… It’s not much of a song. If I actually wanted to relax, I would listen to classical music. Before I was a doctor, I wanted to be a musician. I wanted to be a flutist but I wasn’t good enough to be a flutist so I had to do medicine instead. So I go back and listed to something like Mozart’s First Flute Concerto.

How many hours do you sleep a day?

Oh, now that’s really interesting because I think sleep is incredibly important. So I do a lot trying get myself to have at least seven hours sleep every night. Now sometimes we can’t do it when we are on call and that’s okay, I try to make it up but there is a great book out there called “Why We Sleep”; it will change the way you think about the sleep forever. It is brilliant for learning, health, everything. You have to sleep. You have to sleep!

What did you want to be when you grew up?

So couple of things. When I was younger, I wanted to be a pilot and I still think that’s a great job. I think I might have quite enjoyed being a pilot. Later on, I wanted to be a flutist. I wanted to be a professional musician but sadly I was not good enough to be so. 

Which team are you a fan of?

So my grandfather played for “Manchester City”. So my family plays Manchester City. If you’ve got time for the full story, he was six foot six. He was a goalkeeper. And people ask me if I can play football cause he was such a good footballer, he wasn’t, he was a terrible footballer, he was just very good at stopping other people play football. 

Who is the biggest influencer on you and why?

There are number and if you’re thinking historically in my profession, it’s some of the amazing clinicians in Manchester when I was there when I was a medical student and later a junior doctor. There are many but I would name “Tony Redmond”, “Kevin Mackway-Jones”, “Pete Driscoll” as really influential people both academically, clinically and personally. 

What is the most important lesson you learned as an emergency physician?

I think it’s being able to work with uncertainty. A lot of the decisions that we make is time critical and information light. So it’s working in that area of probability and uncertainty. That’s what makes us emergency physicians and I think those are the lessons which have made me a better clinician over the years.

The hardest thing about being an emergency physician is?

The hardest think is probably the hours and the need to keep up to date in a very broad specialty so you’ve got so many things to look at and so many thing to keep up-to-date with.

The best thing about being an emergency physician is?

We have the best stories. It’s the coolest job in medicine. What else do you need?

The full interview is 24 minutes long and includes many advice on life, wellness, and our profession. We will be sharing short videos from this interview. However, the full interview will be published as an audio file in our Soundcloud account. 

This interview was recorded during the EACEM2018 in Turkey. We thank EMAT.

The interview was recorded and produced by

Arif Alper Cevik

Elif Dilek Cakal

Murat Cetin

What every Med Student/Intern should know about EM

james-holliman

Rob Rogers

Joe Lex

C. James Holliman

Learn the secrets of Emergency Medicine from the fabulous four chapters prepared by three worldwide experts. Listen or read, but know these stuff as early as possible in your medicine/emergency medicine career.

Choosing the Emergency Medicine As A Career

by C. James Holliman The specialty of Emergency Medicine (EM) is a great career choice for medical students and interns.  In August 2013, I celebrated

Read More »

Emergency Medicine: A Unique Specialty

by Will Sanderson, Danny Cuevas, Rob Rogers Imagine walking into the hospital to start your day – ambulances are blaring, the waiting room is clamoring, babies

Read More »

The Importance of The Emergency Medicine Clerkship

by Linda Katirji, Farhad Aziz, Rob Rogers Introduction The Emergency Medicine (EM) clerkship typically takes place during the fourth year of medical school. However, some

Read More »

Thinking Like an Emergency Physician

by Joe Lex Emergency Medicine is the most interesting 15 minutes of every other specialty. – Dan Sandberg, BEEM Conference, 2014 Why are we different?

Read More »

A Little White Coat and A Stethoscope

Ibrahim Sarbay

Turkey

I will never forget the time that I acted as a “medical doctor” at the 1st year-end show of the elementary school. A little white coat tailored for me and a stethoscope that my dad borrowed from a nurse were all the needs to become a “medical doctor” for my little self. When I appeared on the scene, saw the audience and realized glimpses of admiration in their eyes, I realized that I want to become a medical doctor. Not for wealth or fame or glory; but for the single cause of “love.” I loved medicine. I loved medicine even before I learned anything about it. I wanted to become a “medical doctor”! Period.

Years passed by and hundreds of exams later, I had the opportunity to graduate from the school of medicine. Here I was, fulfilled the dream of my profession. But there was another fork in the road. Which specialty would I choose? I knew that I want diversity among my patients, and I was eager to work across disciplines. I liked performing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures together in a timely manner. I believed that emergency care should be free and available to everyone. For these reasons, it was obvious to me that I have to select Emergency Medicine. Fast forward, and I am a third-year emergency medicine resident now. 

I think I don’t have the authority to write about the opportunities that emergency medicine offers or to mentor you about choosing any specialty. Among these brilliant minds of iEM family, I am pretty sure there are dozens of experts to guide you for your destination.

But let me just remind you this: Hundreds of thousands of people arrive at emergency departments every day throughout the world. They receive the best care possible, thanks to the Emergency Medicine specialists. They are there 24/7, 365 days of the year with one rule: “Anyone, anything, anytime.” I personally can’t see a more noble approach than that.

Helen Keller once said “Life is either a daring adventure or nothing,” and Emergency Medicine is, for sure, a daring adventure. If you feel the same, then Emergency Medicine is the right choice for you.

Suggested Chapters

Choosing the Emergency Medicine As A Career

C. James Holliman

Emergency Medicine: A Unique Specialty

Will Sanderson, Danny Cuevas, Rob Rogers

Happy week with tons of education!

Being A Woman In Emergency Medicine

being a women in EM

Gül Pamukçu Günaydın

Turkey

Watching the famous TV series “ER” in my 3rd year of medical school I decided to be an “ER doctor.” I started my Emergency Medicine residency in 2003. So this is my 15th year in Emergency Medicine. I have not regretted my choice yet, and I cannot imagine myself being anything else but an Emergency Physician.

Emergency medicine is indeed a fulfilling career choice for a variety of reasons: first of all, we are cool, we never panic over an emergency. Secondly, emergency medicine is never boring, every shift in the Emergency Department is filled with diverse cases waiting to be solved, like a puzzle. We treat patients in every age group with all kinds of chief complaints, and we hear all sorts of exciting stories. We are there for people who need us most, 24/7, on one of the worst days of their lives, regardless of their background and financial status. We bring patients who are near death back to life, and in every shift, we feel that we make a real difference.

Having said all this, I admit that the life of an Emergency Medicine physician is not a perfect fit for everyone. For example, although shift work is flexible by its nature and you have control over your schedule, shift work is not desirable to everyone. If you plan ahead shift work will allow you to take more vacations any time during the year but if something comes up last minute, there is a pretty good chance that you will miss it. Night shifts may easily disrupt your body cycle even if you follow the recommendations for sleep and it gets harder with age. Working weekends and holidays will mean missing some family gatherings or events at your children’s school and may make your social life difficult. On the bright side, you will always have free weekdays to run errands or catch up with friends on their lunch breaks. Although you do not bring work to your home, (when your shift is over you just pass your patients to another doctor, leave emergency department, and you are not on call) sometimes your shift is so physically exhausting and emotionally draining that you have little energy left for home.

If you are living in a culture where child raising, housework or care of the elderly is seen primarily as women’s duty, or you choose a partner that thinks so, you may have a harder time in life regardless of the specialty you choose as a woman. You may solve some of this issue by willing to accept all help you are offered from close ones and purchase help when necessary to share some of these duties. You may find fewer role models in Emergency Medicine compared to your male peers, but if you look carefully, you will recognize female or male leaders close to you, who understand the difficulties you face and offer you their mentorship.

When choosing any specialty, think about not just now but try to imagine what would make you happy in 10-20-30 years. Yes, being an Emergency Medicine specialist has its challenges and is harder in some aspects compared to other specialties, but I think most of the challenges are there regardless of being men or women. I also believe that with a little flexibility and creativity you can overcome the difficulties, so join us who find joy and feel content in the vibrant and exciting environment of emergency medicine.

Suggested Chapters

Choosing the Emergency Medicine As A Career

C. James Holliman

Emergency Medicine: A Unique Specialty

Will Sanderson, Danny Cuevas, Rob Rogers