Why is emergency medicine training important in medical schools?

Why is emergency medicine training important in medical schools?

The ability to promptly and accurately diagnose and treat patients in critical condition is a crucial skill that students learn in emergency medicine programs. This exposure is especially important for doctors who practice in fast-paced environments like emergency rooms, urgent care clinics, and hospitals immediately after their graduation in some countries.

The ability to promptly recognize and stabilize critically sick patients is a key skill that is taught to prospective doctors as part of emergency medical training. This entails not only the ability to see the warning indications of illnesses like heart attacks, strokes, and septic shock, but also to initiate life-saving treatments like cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the administration of antibiotics.

Medical students can learn to function well under pressure by participating in emergency medicine rotations. It’s very common for emergency departments to be noisy and hectic due to the high volume of people who are there for immediate attention. So, in order to offer the best treatment for their patients in situations where time and resources are limited, and many distractors in the environment, all doctors need to be able to think fast and make choices on the fly.

Learning to work with other medical professionals is also a crucial part of emergency medicine education. Patients in emergency departments are usually cared for by a multidisciplinary group consisting of doctors, nurses, and other medical experts. Medical students learn how to interact and coordinate with these other clinicians as part of their emergency medicine training.

In addition, emergency medicine education is crucial because it prepares future doctors to treat patients with a wide variety of acute and chronic disorders. Every doctor should be able to treat patients of different ages, ethnicities, and economic statuses, and they should do so in a way that is respectful of their cultural origins. Therefore, emergency departments create great opportunities with its unique learning environment for medical students.

Last but not least, emergency medicine education is critical since it helps students get a feel for the field. Physicians who have completed emergency medicine training are better equipped to deal with the high-stakes, high-stress scenarios they will experience in practice, as emergency medicine is one of the most rigorous and demanding specialties in medicine. All medical students, including those who want to specialize elsewhere, should acquire emergency medicine skills, familiarize themselves with how the emergency health care system operates, and be prepared to work in this field if necessary.

IFEM, or the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (ifem.cc), is an organization that supports the advancement of emergency medicine globally. One way that IFEM supports emergency medicine training in medical schools is by providing resources and guidelines for curriculum development. IFEM has created a set of guidelines for emergency medicine training, which can serve as a framework for medical schools to develop their own curricula. Additionally, IFEM offers training opportunities and conferences for medical educators to learn from each other and share best practices.

To improve emergency medicine training in their own countries, other nations can look to IFEM’s guidelines as a starting point for developing their own curricula. They can also seek out partnerships with IFEM and other organizations, to share knowledge and resources. Providing opportunities for medical students to gain hands-on experience in emergency medicine, such as through clinical rotations or simulation training, can definitely be effective in preparing them for the challenges they may face in the future clinical practice. Finally, investing in the development of emergency medicine residency programs can help to ensure that there is a pipeline of well-trained emergency physicians to serve the needs of the community.

In conclusion, emergency medicine training is a crucial part of a medical education because it prepares students for the realities of practice by teaching them how to quickly and accurately assess and treat critically ill patients, how to work effectively in high-stress environments, how to collaborate with other healthcare providers, how to care for patients from a wide variety of backgrounds and with a wide variety of medical conditions. Without this exposure, medical students would be less equipped to deal with complicated and challenging circumstances in clinical practice. Therefore, we highly recommend medical schools consider opening emergency medicine rotations or increasing the time of exposure to emergency medicine education.

Further Reading

  • Rybarczyk MM, Ludmer N, Broccoli MC, Kivlehan SM, Niescierenko M, Bisanzo M, Checkett KA, Rouhani SA, Tenner AG, Geduld H, Reynolds T. Emergency Medicine Training Programs in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review. Ann Glob Health. 2020 Jun 16;86(1):60. doi: 10.5334/aogh.2681. PMID: 32587810; PMCID: PMC7304456.
  • International EM Core Curriculum and Education Committee for the International Federation for Emergency Medicine. International Federation for Emergency Medicine model curriculum for emergency medicine specialists. CJEM. 2011 Mar;13(2):109-21. PMID: 21435317.
  • Arnold JL, Holliman CJ. Lessons learned from international emergency medicine development. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2005 Feb;23(1):133-47. doi: 10.1016/j.emc.2004.10.001. PMID: 15663978.
  • Beyene T, Tupesis JP, Azazh A. Attitude of interns towards implementation and contribution of undergraduate Emergency Medicine training: Experience of an Ethiopian Medical School. Afr J Emerg Med. 2017 Sep;7(3):108-112. doi: 10.1016/j.afjem.2017.04.008. Epub 2017 Apr 20. Erratum in: Afr J Emerg Med. 2017 Dec;7(4):189. PMID: 30456120; PMCID: PMC6234139.
  • Beckers SK, Timmermann A, Müller MP, Angstwurm M, Walcher F. Undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care: a nationwide survey at German medical schools. BMC Emerg Med. 2009 May 12;9:7. doi: 10.1186/1471-227X-9-7. PMID: 19435518; PMCID: PMC2689168.
  • Wald DA, Lin M, Manthey DE, Rogers RL, Zun LS, Christopher T. Emergency medicine in the medical school curriculum. Acad Emerg Med. 2010 Oct;17 Suppl 2:S26-30. doi: 10.1111/j.1553-2712.2010.00896.x. PMID: 21199080.

Related iEM Articles

Arif Alper Cevik, MD, FEMAT, FIFEM

Arif Alper Cevik, MD, FEMAT, FIFEM

Prof Cevik is an Emergency Medicine academician at United Arab Emirates University, interested in international emergency medicine, emergency medicine education, medical education, point of care ultrasound and trauma. He is the founder and director of the International Emergency Medicine Education Project – iem-student.org, vice-chair of the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (IFEM) core curriculum and education committee and board member of the Asian Society for Emergency Medicine and Emirati Board of Emergency Medicine.

Cite this article as: iEM Education Project Team, "Why is emergency medicine training important in medical schools?," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, February 24, 2023, https://iem-student.org/2023/02/24/why-is-emergency-medicine-training-important-in-medical-schools/, date accessed: April 1, 2023

Key recommendations for medical students interested in pursuing a career in emergency medicine

Key recommendations for medical students interested in pursuing a career in emergency medicine.

Emergency Medicine is a popular speciality among students, and residency programs are receiving an increased amount of applications year by year. However, high competition to get into the residency programs requires successful preparation for the speciality training. In addition, choosing this speciality as a future professional career may fit some individuals while it can not be suitable for others. 

Here are some recommendations to be prepared and understand whether emergency medicine is a good fit for you.

  1. Get involved in emergency medicine early: Try to find ways to get involved during medical school, such as volunteering at an emergency department or shadowing an emergency medicine physician. This will give you a better understanding of the field and help you determine if it is a good fit for you.
  2. Seek out opportunities to develop clinical skills: Emergency medicine is a highly clinical field, and you will need to be comfortable managing patients with a wide range of medical conditions. Participating in clinical rotations and other hands-on learning experiences can help you build your clinical skills and prepare you for a career in emergency medicine.
  3. Network with emergency medicine professionals: Building relationships with emergency medicine physicians and other healthcare professionals can help you learn about different career paths in the field and gain valuable insight into the daily challenges and rewards of working in emergency medicine.
  4. Stay up-to-date on the latest developments: Emergency medicine is a rapidly evolving field, and it is important to stay informed about the latest developments in patient care and medical technology. Attending conferences and workshops, reading professional journals, and participating in online communities can help you stay current.
  5. Consider a residency program: Many emergency medicine physicians complete a residency program in the field, which provides in-depth training and hands-on experience in emergency medicine. Consider applying to a residency program if you are serious about pursuing a career in emergency medicine.
  6. Focus on developing your interpersonal skills: Effective communication and interpersonal skills are essential for success in emergency medicine, as you will be working with patients, families, and other healthcare professionals in high-pressure situations. Make an effort to develop your interpersonal skills, and seek feedback from others on how you can improve.
  7. Stay passionate: Emergency medicine can be challenging, but it can also be incredibly rewarding. Make sure to stay passionate about your chosen field and continue to seek out opportunities for growth and learning.

Emergency medicine is a challenging but rewarding field that requires a strong foundation in clinical skills, a commitment to staying current with the latest developments, and excellent interpersonal skills. If you are passionate about helping patients in high-pressure situations and are willing to work hard to develop your skills, a career in emergency medicine may be a great fit for you.

Further Reading

  • Huang RD, Lutfy-Clayton L, Franzen D, Pelletier-Bui A, Gordon DC, Jarou Z, Cranford J, Hopson LR. More Is More: Drivers of the Increase in Emergency Medicine Residency Applications. West J Emerg Med. 2020 Dec 10;22(1):77-85. doi: 10.5811/westjem.2020.10.48210. PMID: 33439811; PMCID: PMC7806335.
  • Blackshaw AM, Watson SC, Bush JS. The Cost and Burden of the Residency Match in Emergency Medicine. West J Emerg Med. 2017 Jan;18(1):169-173. doi: 10.5811/westjem.2016.10.31277. Epub 2016 Dec 19. PMID: 28116032; PMCID: PMC5226755.
  • Pianosi K, Stewart SA, Hurley K. Medical Students’ Perceptions of Emergency Medicine Careers. Cureus. 2017 Aug 24;9(8):e1608. doi: 10.7759/cureus.1608. PMID: 29075586; PMCID: PMC5655118.
  • Alkhaneen H, Alhusain F, Alshahri K, Al Jerian N. Factors influencing medical students’ choice of emergency medicine as a career specialty-a descriptive study of Saudi medical students [published correction appears in Int J Emerg Med. 2018 Dec 17;11(1):56]. Int J Emerg Med. 2018;11(1):14. Published 2018 Mar 7. doi:10.1186/s12245-018-0174-y
  • Boyd JS, Clyne B, Reinert SE, Zink BJ. Emergency medicine career choice: a profile of factors and influences from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) graduation questionnaires. Acad Emerg Med. 2009;16(6):544-549. doi:10.1111/j.1553-2712.2009.00385.x

Related iEM Articles

Arif Alper Cevik, MD, FEMAT, FIFEM

Arif Alper Cevik, MD, FEMAT, FIFEM

Prof Cevik is an Emergency Medicine academician at United Arab Emirates University, interested in international emergency medicine, emergency medicine education, medical education, point of care ultrasound and trauma. He is the founder and director of the International Emergency Medicine Education Project – iem-student.org, vice-chair of the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (IFEM) core curriculum and education committee and board member of the Asian Society for Emergency Medicine and Emirati Board of Emergency Medicine.

Cite this article as: iEM Education Project Team, "Key recommendations for medical students interested in pursuing a career in emergency medicine," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, February 15, 2023, https://iem-student.org/2023/02/15/key-recommendations-for-medical-students-interested-in-pursuing-a-career-in-emergency-medicine/, date accessed: April 1, 2023

Why do medical students favour emergency medicine experience?

Why do medical students favour emergency medicine experience?

Emergency Medicine is a challenging and fast-paced speciality that is often considered one of the most popular clerkships among medical students. The appeal of emergency medicine stems from its dynamic nature, which requires medical students to be versatile, adaptable and able to make quick decisions.

One of the primary reasons that medical students like emergency medicine is the opportunity to learn the care for a wide range of patients. In the emergency department, medical students are exposed to a diverse patient population that includes individuals with acute illnesses and injuries, as well as those with chronic conditions that have taken a turn for the worse. This exposure to a wide range of patients allows medical students to develop a broad knowledge base and gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of medical care.

Another factor that attracts medical students to emergency medicine is the fast-paced environment. The emergency department is often the first point of contact for patients experiencing an acute illness or injury, and medical students must be able to assess, diagnose, and treat patients quickly. In addition, this challenging and fast-paced environment helps medical students to develop strong critical thinking and decision-making skills, which are essential for success in any medical speciality.

In addition to the opportunities for hands-on patient care, emergency medicine also provides medical students with the opportunity to work closely with other healthcare professionals. In the emergency department, medical students interact with nurses, paramedics, radiologists, and other specialists and learn to provide comprehensive care to patients. This interdisciplinary approach to care allows medical students to gain a deeper understanding of the role of each healthcare professional and to develop strong collaborative skills.

Emergency medicine is also a highly rewarding speciality for medical students, as it provides the opportunity to make a significant impact on a patient’s health in a short amount of time. Whether being in a team stabilizing a critically ill patient, providing pain relief, or simply offering emotional support, medical students in the emergency department have the opportunity to make a real difference in the lives of patients.

Finally, the training and education opportunities available in emergency medicine are another reason why medical students often favour this clerkship. Emergency medicine residency programs, with a robust training structure, are designed to provide medical students with extensive exposure to the most challenging cases and to provide a strong foundation in critical thinking and decision-making skills. Additionally, emergency medicine residency programs often offer a variety of elective rotations, which allow medical students to tailor their training to their specific interests and career goals.

In conclusion, emergency medicine is a popular clerkship among medical students for many reasons. From the fast-paced and challenging environment to the opportunities for hands-on patient care and interdisciplinary collaboration to the training and education opportunities available, emergency medicine provides medical students with a well-rounded and rewarding clerkship experience. Whether they go on to specialize in emergency medicine or another medical speciality, the skills, knowledge and experience gained in the emergency department will serve medical students well throughout their careers.

Further Reading

  • Pianosi K, Stewart SA, Hurley K. Medical Students’ Perceptions of Emergency Medicine Careers. Cureus. 2017 Aug 24;9(8):e1608. doi: 10.7759/cureus.1608. PMID: 29075586; PMCID: PMC5655118.
  • Langlo NM, Orvik AB, Dale J, Uleberg O, Bjørnsen LP. The acute sick and injured patients: an overview of the emergency department patient population at a Norwegian University Hospital Emergency Department. Eur J Emerg Med. 2014 Jun;21(3):175-80. doi: 10.1097/MEJ.0b013e3283629c18. PMID: 23680865.
  • Ray JC, Hopson LR, Peterson W, Santen SA, Khandelwal S, Gallahue FE, White M, Burkhardt JC. Choosing emergency medicine: Influences on medical students’ choice of emergency medicine. PLoS One. 2018 May 9;13(5):e0196639. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0196639. PMID: 29742116; PMCID: PMC5942813.
  • Benner P, Hughes RG, Sutphen M. Clinical Reasoning, Decisionmaking, and Action: Thinking Critically and Clinically. In: Hughes RG, editor. Patient Safety and Quality: An Evidence-Based Handbook for Nurses. Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US); 2008 Apr. Chapter 6. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK2643/

Related iEM Articles

Arif Alper Cevik, MD, FEMAT, FIFEM

Arif Alper Cevik, MD, FEMAT, FIFEM

Prof Cevik is an Emergency Medicine academician at United Arab Emirates University, interested in international emergency medicine, emergency medicine education, medical education, point of care ultrasound and trauma. He is the founder and director of the International Emergency Medicine Education Project – iem-student.org, vice-chair of the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (IFEM) core curriculum and education committee and board member of the Asian Society for Emergency Medicine and Emirati Board of Emergency Medicine.

Cite this article as: iEM Education Project Team, "Why do medical students favour emergency medicine experience?," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, February 8, 2023, https://iem-student.org/2023/02/08/why-do-medical-students-favour-emergency-medicine-experience/, date accessed: April 1, 2023

Two Roads, One Path: Academic vs. Non-Academic EM – Part 1

academic emergency medicine vs non-academic emergency medicine

Are academic and non-academic emergency medicine (EM) really two completely different worlds?

With this post I want to start a short series on this topic, hopefully with a little twist in the approach.

Why even question?

How and why do you question a distinction that is on the one hand very apparent and real, and on the other is very customary and traditional and may be true for all medical specialties?

Part of the answer is that in order to plan a fulfilling life in EM (not everyone believes in a “career”), it is best to understand the entire landscape – not only regionally and nationally, but also globally. To this end, perhaps more innovation, ingenuity and out-of-the-box thinking is needed to benefit future EM trainees than what habitual teachings on the subject offer.

Are we really committed for life to whatever we pick out of residency?  Is the decision regarding a fellowship for a senior registrar a now-or-never decision? Is there such an age as “too late” for academics and vice versa? Is the connection between academic and non-academic EM a one-way street? Is it true that once in EM you cannot do anything else because “you don’t know how to do anything else”, according to some?

Today we will begin by looking at a few labels and presuppositions that may be cemented in the collective EM subconscious. It is my intuitive suspicion that only by uncorking, uncovering or by altogether removing some of these, will we be able to get to the real deal underneath.

As they say, the devil is in the details.

Discussion One:  Smoke and Mirrors

Where will you work at and who will you work for?

First, academic vs. non-academic EM identity can to a large extent be affected by how your nation’s overall healthcare system is set up.

In countries with predominantly socialized medicine, “community practice” – very possibly a US-driven term – may simply indicate not being employed at one of the largest tertiary urban centers available, which carry all the prestige and concentrate all of research efforts. In such nations a classically proposed counterpart to academic medicine, a business-driven private EM enterprise, may be lacking completely.

If everyone works for the government, be it local or federal, then becoming “academic”, equally or more so than due to one’s personal talents and inclinations, may be the outcome of having urbanization, luck, connections or some other ability to find a bigger place to work. At one point or another one simply wins the lucky lottery ticket to move and “move up”. In essence, the EM physician is a large capital city’s teaching hospital worker first, and an academician largely by default. Such career aiming of course succumbs to the philosophy that urban and central is always better than rural and peripheral.

Second, let’s consider “community practice” as a kind of a weird term: if you are in academic EM, who else are you serving if not some community or communities? These may be communities of colleagues, trainees, organizations and researchers in addition to patients, but they are communities nonetheless.

Equally, if an EM physician is truly and solely in non-academic practice, does she really envision and lead her professional life without any engagement in research, publications, teaching, administration, local and international networking? What would the website “Life in non-academic EM” look like – a steady picture of a work mule without links or content?

Both terms academic and non-academic EM may be infused and muddied with other meanings like institutional- or government-affiliated practice, private practice, non-teaching, and so on.

In real life, both type of endeavors (if the distinction between academic and non-academic is genuine) can be conducted in very urban or in rather rural environments; and either practice type may be institutionally affiliated or tied to NGOs, governments or businesses. In the United States some recent criticism has sprung related to the so-called inbred residencies – EM training programs created and operated by large corporate entities.

More importantly for a future trainee: both types of EM practices may or may not involve exclusive night shifts, overtime, faraway travel, being underpaid, unfair seniority, feeling unappreciated and cogwheelish (new word for you), without a clear sense of direction or belonging.

Don’t get ridiculous with cliches.

Now to some cliches, most of which are from the trainees themselves.

One: the sigh “I love teaching, but I hate research” from those choosing non-academics.

Let me ask a provocative question: are all of the globally famous EM research superstars you and I know necessarily brilliant teachers? It appears that “I love research, but I hate teaching” never stopped anyone from an academic road. This, of course, is poor logic either way.

Teaching is a hard thing to do well, and there is a distinction between bedside and classroom teaching, but so is research! Just like the so-called charisma of say a journalist, perhaps some abilities one can be born with (in the words of Professor Snape, “possess the predisposition”). Yet, vast majority of skills can be and have to be acquired.

So instead of anguishing over your inborn leanings and phobias, think rather of what you would prefer to be doing, once you learn it, during any typical week of the next five or more years after residency. Now, how can you realistically translate that into life, given the types of attainable EM jobs out there in your current or anticipated environment?

Two: “get in, get out (of the ED), and enjoy the rest of your life!”

Often the EM backpack mentality, as bumper-stickered above, is sold as the prime appeal of non-academic work.

All true – academicians, when not at work, do not enjoy their lives to any significant extent. They spend most of their free time in dusky library dungeons and at other EM-bound noble activities, while those outside of academics enjoy hundreds of free hours sailing the high seas or YouTube.

As a very weak truism, non-academic EM may sometimes open up more free time for non-EM related activities of one’s life. But is wastage of time laying on a couch an activity, and are you susceptible?

On the contrary, it may be plausible that academicians may enjoy fewer and shorter shifts, more diverse practices, more immediate access to cutting edge innovations and articles, fuller specialist call panels and fewer unfinished charts to review and sign at home.

Three: “One should only do a fellowship if planning an academic career…in which case, you better get into one!”

No, you should probably do a fellowship primarily because you are very interested in what the fellowship is about. Everything else is an extra, albeit a welcome one – like perhaps natural entry into an academic institution or a network of contacts for expanded career options.

It is also completely legitimate to consider the burden and the years of your medical training so far. In some countries just getting to a recognized EM residency (which may be abroad!) has already cost you several years post medical graduation. In such cases, ambivalent feelings towards adding even more years via a fellowship to the perpetual student status are fully valid.

On the other hand, it may very well be that in the near future (if not already), all EM docs without a fellowship, whether entrepreneurial or in public service, academic or not, will become non-competitive for best jobs.

Is doing a fellowship straight off the bat after residency the only option? What if you are not interested in any during training, but become interested later?

To be fair, right after residency makes not only intuitive sense, but typically the system is set up that way, especially fellowship funding. Still, one has to be careful, as not all of fellowships are funded, nor are all fellowships accredited. Viewed in a constructive light, this creates not only constraints but also degrees of freedom for making choices.

True, if years pass, an entire family’s lifestyle dependent on attending level salary may not be very compatible with the salary of a fellow even with all the moonlighting in the world. But is the latter income difference profound in your country, or are the main barriers to a delayed fellowship of a different sort – e.g., government rules written in stone, the mass competition from the youngsters or some unspoken negative culture towards old-timers in their forties among fellowship directors?

Overall, nothing is insurmountable if given enough will, persistence and preparation. Otherwise, there would have been no people in their forties in my medical school class or residency.

Which professional currency would you rather deal in?

All mentioned above is not to be construed to say that some harsh realities do not exist.  One problem with cliches is that they are very zonal, while proclaiming to be universals.

The simple overhanging truth is that every field has its own currency, and both academic and non-academic EM are no exceptions.

For future EM trainees this is pertinent and applicable not only because of the obvious choices you will have to make after formal training, but also because of the need to gear and adjust your preferences while still in training.

Grant funding and publications are absolutely the ubiquitous currency in academics. Productivity, billing and people management (aka “leadership”) skills are the hardcore coinage in business-driven EM. Advancement and promotion within socialized medicine systems may call for yet another set of valuables altogether.

Still, thinking in terms of such hard constraints will tend to corner you in at least two ways.

First, it is not to be implied that ability to generate grants or publications never helps or is not useful in non-academics, or that no academician has to keep track of her billing and productivity metrics.

Second, if cornered, you will be liable to forget the correct reasons for choosing a certain path – the ones that spring from your deep interests and curiosities. These reasons miraculously happen to be the same ones to keep you out of burnout and disappointment years later, no matter what type of practice.

I am proposing a much simpler approach to the above dilemma. Choose currencies that will create the least disdain and subconscious resistance (manifested by nausea and wanting to do what your dog does after it gets wet), and then ones for which you think you already have more inborn propensity if not talent.

Finally, are you really ego-, career- and promotion-driven?  How would you define your own future success in EM?

Enough from me for now.

In future discussions and interviews we will try to elicit opinions of other EM physicians to shine different shades of light on the intriguing sub-topics this topic uncovers.

Stay tuned!

 

Video – Panel Discussion – EM Education in Asia

This blog post includes one of the presentations of Emergency Medicine Education in Asia Webinar organized by Asian Society for Emergency Medicine on July 9, 2022. 

Video – International Emergency Medicine Education Project

This blog post includes one of the presentations of Emergency Medicine Education in Asia Webinar organized by Asian Society for Emergency Medicine on July 9, 2022. 

Video – Road Forwards in Emergency Medicine Education

This blog post includes one of the presentations of Emergency Medicine Education in Asia Webinar organized by Asian Society for Emergency Medicine on July 9, 2022. 

Video – Educator in Emergency Medicine

This blog post includes one of the presentations of Emergency Medicine Education in Asia Webinar organized by Asian Society for Emergency Medicine on July 9, 2022. 

Video – Challenges in Emergency Medicine Education

This blog post includes one of the presentations of Emergency Medicine Education in Asia Webinar organized by Asian Society for Emergency Medicine on July 9, 2022. 

Video – EM Education Across Asia – EM Residents

This blog post includes one of the presentations of Emergency Medicine Education in Asia Webinar organized by Asian Society for Emergency Medicine on July 9, 2022. 

Video – EM Education in India – Medical Students

This blog post includes one of the presentations of Emergency Medicine Education in Asia Webinar organized by Asian Society for Emergency Medicine on July 9, 2022. 

IFEM Medical Student Symposium – Team Oceania

Dear medical students and EM community,

We invite you to the IFEM Medical Student Symposium, the first of its kind, to discuss the present and future of undergraduate emergency medicine education. The IFEM Medical Student Symposium will bring together speakers, facilitators, and attendees from seven regions of Africa, Asia, Central and South America, Europe, the Gulf, North America, and Oceania. You can find more details on the flyer below.

It will take place on June 14th, 2022, at 13:30 AEST (GMT +10). The symposium fee is 10 AUD. Thanks to IFEM leadership and the ICEM organising committee, participants intending to join the Medical Student Symposium only can use this link on the workshop page to register without an additional conference fee.

Please share this blogpost with your colleagues and trainees who might be interested in joining this conversation. We are looking forward to meeting you all virtually at the symposium.

Best regards,
Dr Elif Dilek Cakal & Dr Erin Simon
IFEM Medical Student Symposium Co-leads
IFEM Core Curriculum and Education Committee