Interview – Vicky Noble – US training in medical schools

We interviewed with world renowned emergency and critical care US expert “Vicky Noble” about US training in medical schools.

Read US Chapters and Posts

Interview: Jesus Daniel Lopez Tapia

We interviewed with Dr. Jesus Daniel Lopez Tapia. He is the Dean of University Monterrey, College of Medicine and immediate past president of Mexican Society of Emergency Medicine. 

Highlights from the interview

How many medical school in Mexico?

180

What percentage medical schools have EM course for medical students?

80%

How many EM residency spot every year?

400

How many EM residency program in Mexico?

75

What do graduates do after the graduation?

80% starts working in the EDs. 20% starts residency.

Video Interview – Rob Rogers – Part 3

Great messages for medical students, interns and new EM residents!

Watch the part 3 here!

You can listen full interview here!

Expert Opinion: Luis Vargas – ED Overcrowding

EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT OVERCROWDING

Dear students, emergency departments are suffering overcrowding since long time. There are various causes of this situation as well as solutions. It is better to know about ED overcrowding before your first shift. Dr. Luis Vargas from Colombia summarizes his lecture presented in 30th Emergency Medicine Congress of Mexican Society in Cancun.

ED Overcrowding - English

Manejo y consecuencias del sobrecupo en urgencias

Video Interview – Rob Rogers – Part 2

Great messages for medical students, interns and new EM residents!

Are you ready to meet the genuine people behind the professional?

iEM team proudly presents the ICON360 project. In this pleasantly educational series, world-renowned experts will share their habits, give advice on life, wellness and the profession.

Our guest is Dr. Rob Rogers.

Trained in Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine, Rob Rogers currently practices Emergency Medicine at the University of Kentucky’s Chandler Hospital in the Department of Emergency Medicine. An innovative medical educator on the cutting edge of creativity, he shares his knowledge on the monthly medical education Medutopia Podcast. Rob co-founded The Teaching Institute and in 2014 created The Teaching Course at The University of Maryland. As a passionate medical education enthusiast, podcast evangelist, learning choreographer, and entrepreneur, Rob works tirelessly to change the world of medical education by reinventing it.

The full interview is 24 minutes long and includes many advice on life, wellness, and our profession. We will be sharing short videos from this interview. However, the full interview will be published as an audio file in our Soundcloud account. 

This interview was recorded during the EACEM2018 in Turkey. We thank EMAT.

Arif Alper Cevik

Elif Dilek Cakal

Murat Cetin

Against Medical Advice and Elopement

In certain circumstances, patients may request to leave prior to completion of their medical evaluation and treatment. In this situation, it is essential for the last health care professional caring for the patient to document clearly why the patient left and attested that the patient had the mental capacity to make such a decision at that time (Henry, 2013). While some electronic documentation systems have templates in place to assist with this documentation, Table 2 provides basic information for against medical advice (AMA) discharge documentation that can be used to create a uniform template (Henry, 2013; Siff, 2011; Levy, 2012; Devitt, 2000).

What to do?

Interventions in the ED Discharge Process

DomainIntervention
ContentStandardize approach
DeliveryVerbal instructions (language and culture appropriate)
Written instructions (literary levels)
Basic Instructions (including return precautions)
Media, visual cues or adjuncts
ComprehensionConfirm comprehension (teach-back method)
ImplementationResource connections (Rx, appointment, durable medical supplies, follow-up)
Medication review

An attempt should be made to provide the patient with appropriate discharge instructions, even if a complete diagnosis may not yet be determined. Include advice for the patient to follow up with his physician, strict return precautions, and concerning symptoms that should prompt the patient to seek further care. It should also be made clear that leaving against medical advice does not prevent the patient from returning to the emergency department for further evaluation if his symptoms worsen, or if he changes his mind. Despite a common notion to the contrary, simply leaving against medical advice does not automatically imply that physicians are immune to potential medical liability (Levy, 2012; Devitt, 2000). If a patient lacks decision-making capacity to be able to adequately understand the rationale and consequences of leaving AMA and his condition places him at risk for imminent harm, involuntary hospitalization is warranted. In unclear circumstances and if available, psychiatry can assist in determining capacity, especially in the case of patients with mental health conditions.

Elopement is a similar process where patients disappear during the care process. While it is difficult to provide discharge paperwork for these patients, documenting the actions taken to find the patient is essential (e.g., searching the ED, having security check the surrounding areas). In addition, attempt to reach the patient by phone to discuss his elopement and any additional care issues or concerns. Documentation of these attempts or any additional conversation is very important (Henry, 2013; Siff, 2011).

To Know More About It?

References

  • Brooten J, Nicks B. Discharge Communications. In: Cevik AA, Quek LS, Noureldin A, Cakal ED (eds) iEmergency Medicine for Medical Students and Interns – 2018. Retrieved February 27, 2019, from https://iem-student.org/discharge-communications/
  • Henry GL, Gupta G. (2013). Medical-Legal Issues in Emergency Medicine. In Adams (Ed.), Emergency Medicine Clinical Essentials, 2nd Ed; 1759-65. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier.
  • Siff JE. (2011). Legal Issues in Emergency Medicine. In Tintinalli’s (Ed.), Emergency Medicine, 7th Ed; 2021-31. McGraw-Hill.
  • Levy F, Mareiniss DP, Lacovelli C. The Importance of a Proper Against-Medical-Advice (AMA) Discharge. How Signing Out AMA May Create Significant Liability Protection for Providers. J Emerg Med. 2012;43(3):516-520.
  • Devitt PJ, Devitt AC, Dewan M. An examination of whether discharging patients against medical advice protects physicians from malpractice charges. Psychiatr Serv. 2000;51:899-902.

What every Med Student/Intern should know about EM

james-holliman

Rob Rogers

Joe Lex

C. James Holliman

Learn the secrets of Emergency Medicine from the fabulous four chapters prepared by three worldwide experts. Listen or read, but know these stuff as early as possible in your medicine/emergency medicine career.

Thinking Like an Emergency Physician

by Joe Lex Emergency Medicine is the most interesting 15 minutes of every other specialty. – Dan Sandberg, BEEM Conference, 2014 Why are we different?

Read More »

The Importance of The Emergency Medicine Clerkship

by Linda Katirji, Farhad Aziz, Rob Rogers Introduction The Emergency Medicine (EM) clerkship typically takes place during the fourth year of medical school. However, some

Read More »

Choosing the Emergency Medicine As A Career

by C. James Holliman The specialty of Emergency Medicine (EM) is a great career choice for medical students and interns.  In August 2013, I celebrated

Read More »

Emergency Medicine: A Unique Specialty

by Will Sanderson, Danny Cuevas, Rob Rogers Imagine walking into the hospital to start your day – ambulances are blaring, the waiting room is clamoring, babies

Read More »

Being A Woman In Emergency Medicine

being a women in EM

Gül Pamukçu Günaydın

Turkey

Watching the famous TV series “ER” in my 3rd year of medical school I decided to be an “ER doctor.” I started my Emergency Medicine residency in 2003. So this is my 15th year in Emergency Medicine. I have not regretted my choice yet, and I cannot imagine myself being anything else but an Emergency Physician.

Emergency medicine is indeed a fulfilling career choice for a variety of reasons: first of all, we are cool, we never panic over an emergency. Secondly, emergency medicine is never boring, every shift in the Emergency Department is filled with diverse cases waiting to be solved, like a puzzle. We treat patients in every age group with all kinds of chief complaints, and we hear all sorts of exciting stories. We are there for people who need us most, 24/7, on one of the worst days of their lives, regardless of their background and financial status. We bring patients who are near death back to life, and in every shift, we feel that we make a real difference.

Having said all this, I admit that the life of an Emergency Medicine physician is not a perfect fit for everyone. For example, although shift work is flexible by its nature and you have control over your schedule, shift work is not desirable to everyone. If you plan ahead shift work will allow you to take more vacations any time during the year but if something comes up last minute, there is a pretty good chance that you will miss it. Night shifts may easily disrupt your body cycle even if you follow the recommendations for sleep and it gets harder with age. Working weekends and holidays will mean missing some family gatherings or events at your children’s school and may make your social life difficult. On the bright side, you will always have free weekdays to run errands or catch up with friends on their lunch breaks. Although you do not bring work to your home, (when your shift is over you just pass your patients to another doctor, leave emergency department, and you are not on call) sometimes your shift is so physically exhausting and emotionally draining that you have little energy left for home.

If you are living in a culture where child raising, housework or care of the elderly is seen primarily as women’s duty, or you choose a partner that thinks so, you may have a harder time in life regardless of the specialty you choose as a woman. You may solve some of this issue by willing to accept all help you are offered from close ones and purchase help when necessary to share some of these duties. You may find fewer role models in Emergency Medicine compared to your male peers, but if you look carefully, you will recognize female or male leaders close to you, who understand the difficulties you face and offer you their mentorship.

When choosing any specialty, think about not just now but try to imagine what would make you happy in 10-20-30 years. Yes, being an Emergency Medicine specialist has its challenges and is harder in some aspects compared to other specialties, but I think most of the challenges are there regardless of being men or women. I also believe that with a little flexibility and creativity you can overcome the difficulties, so join us who find joy and feel content in the vibrant and exciting environment of emergency medicine.

Suggested Chapters

Choosing the Emergency Medicine As A Career

C. James Holliman

Emergency Medicine: A Unique Specialty

Will Sanderson, Danny Cuevas, Rob Rogers