Question Of The Day #29

question of the day
qod29
842 - Wide QRS complex tachycardia

Which of the following is the most appropriate next step in management for this patient?

This patient presents to the emergency department with seven days of severe vomiting, diarrhea, tachycardia, and borderline hypotension. The clinician should be concerned about dehydration and potential electrolyte derangements induced by the vomiting and diarrhea. Certain electrolyte derangements can put a patient at risk for cardiac dysrhythmias, so ordering a 12-lead EKG is an important step in evaluating any patient with a potential electrolyte disturbance. Dangerous electrolyte disturbances that can predispose a patient to cardiac dysrhythmias include hyperkalemia, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, and hypocalcemia. Signs of hyperkalemia on the EKG include peaked T waves, absent or flattened P waves, widened QRS complexes, or a sine wave morphology. Low potassium, magnesium, and calcium can all prolong the QT interval and predispose the patient to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (Torsades de Pointes). Hypokalemia on EKG may also be associated with a U wave, which is an upward wave that follows the T wave.

This patient’s 12-lead EKG shows a wide-complex tachycardia with QRS complex “twisting” around the isoelectric line and varying QRS amplitudes. These EKG signs, along with the inferred history of severe electrolyte abnormalities, support a diagnosis of Torsades de Pointes (TdP). Another risk factor for TdP is a history of congenital prolonged QT syndromes. Similar to monomorphic ventricular tachycardia, TdP should always be treated with electrical cardioversion if there are any signs of instability (i.e., altered mental status, SBP <90mmHg). A pulseless patient with TdP always necessitates unsynchronized cardioversion, also known as defibrillation. This patient may have briefly syncopized or potentially underwent cardiac arrest. Intravenous Amiodarone (Choice A) and Procainamide (Choice B) are contraindicated in TdP as both of these agents can further prolong the QT interval. These agents can be used in a stable patient with monomorphic ventricular tachycardia. Intravenous Ciprofloxacin (Choice C) is a quinolone antibiotic that is useful for treating infections from gram-negative bacteria. This may be beneficial for this patient, especially if there is a concern for bacterial gastroenteritis. However, quinolone antibiotics also can prolong the QT interval, and this medication will not acutely stabilize this patient. Intravenous Magnesium Sulfate (Choice D) shortens the QT interval and is the preferred therapy for a TdP patient with a pulse. Correct Answer: D

References

Cite this article as: Joseph Ciano, USA, "Question Of The Day #29," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, March 5, 2021, https://iem-student.org/2021/03/05/question-of-the-day-29/, date accessed: August 5, 2021

Question Of The Day #28

question of the day
qod28

EKG#1

710 - hyperkalemia

EKG#2

855 - bradycardia

Which of the following is the most likely underlying cause for this patient’s condition?

This patient presents to the emergency department with vague and nonspecific symptoms of nausea, fatigue, and palpitations. The initial EKG (EKG #1) demonstrates a wide-complex tachycardia (QRS >120msec) with a regular rhythm. The differential diagnosis for wide-complex tachyarrhythmias include ventricular tachycardia (monomorphic ventricular tachycardia), torsades de pointes (polymorphic ventricular tachycardia), coarse ventricular fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardias with aberrancy (i.e. underlying Wolf Parkinson White Syndrome or Ventricular Bundle Branch Block), electrolyte abnormalities (i.e., Hyperkalemia), and from medications (i.e., Na channel blocking agents). If the history is unclear or the patient shows signs of instability, Ventricular tachycardia should always be the assumed tachyarrhythmia. This is managed with electrical cardioversion or with medications (i.e., amiodarone, procainamide, lidocaine), depending on the patient’s symptoms and hemodynamic stability.

The prior EKG for the patient (EKG #2) is helpful in showing that the patient does not have a wide QRS complex at baseline. There also are no EKG signs of Wolf Parkinson White Syndrome (Choice B) on EKG #2, making this choice incorrect. Signs of this cardiac pre-excitation syndrome on EKG include a shortened PR interval and a delta wave (slurred upstroke at the beginning of the QRS complex). Anxiety (Choice D) can cause sinus tachycardia and be a symptom associated with any arrhythmia, but it is not the underlying cause for this patient’s bizarre wide-complex tachydysrhythmia. On a closer look, the patient’s EKG (EKG #1) demonstrates tall, peaked T waves in the precordial leads. This supports a diagnosis of hyperkalemia. Other signs of hyperkalemia on EKG include flattened or absent P waves, widened QRS complexes, or a sine wave morphology. A common underlying cause of hyperkalemia is renal disease (Choice C). Ischemic heart disease (Choice A) is a common underlying cause for ventricular tachycardia. Ventricular tachycardia is less likely in this case given the presence of peaked T waves and the lack of fusion beats, capture beats, or signs of AV dissociation on the 12-lead EKG. Correct Answer: C 

References

  • Brady W.J., & Glass III G.F. (2020). Cardiac rhythm disturbances. Tintinalli J.E., Ma O, Yealy D.M., Meckler G.D., Stapczynski J, Cline D.M., & Thomas S.H.(Eds.), Tintinalli’s Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide, 9e. McGraw-Hill. https://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=2353&sectionid=218687685
  • Burns, E. (2020). Ventricular Tachycardia – Monomorphic VT. Life in The Fast Lane. Retrieved from https://litfl.com/ventricular-tachycardia-monomorphic-ecg-library/

Cite this article as: Joseph Ciano, USA, "Question Of The Day #28," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, February 26, 2021, https://iem-student.org/2021/02/26/question-of-the-day-28/, date accessed: August 5, 2021

Question Of The Day #27

question of the day
qod27
756.1 - palpitation - SOB

Which of the following is the most appropriate next step in management for this patient’s condition?

This patient has a narrow-complex, regular tachycardia that is causing the sensation of palpitations. The clinical history, rapid heart rate, and 12-lead EKG provide enough information to diagnose this patient with supraventricular tachycardia, also known as “SVT.” Supraventricular tachycardias refer to a broad range of arrhythmias, including sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, multifocal atrial tachycardia, and AV nodal re-entry tachycardia. This scenario specifically depicts an AV nodal re-entry tachycardia (AVNRT). AVNRT is a common type of SVT that can occur spontaneously or is triggered by sympathomimetic agents (i.e., cocaine, amphetamines), caffeine, alcohol, exercise, or beta-2 agonists using in asthma treatment (i.e., albuterol, salbutamol). AVNRTs are narrow-complex tachycardias with rates that range from 120-280bpm. P waves are typically absent in AVNRTs, but rarely they may be present as retrograde inverted P waves located immediately before or after the QRS complex. Symptoms experienced by the AVNRT patient may include pre-syncope, syncope, dizziness, palpitations, anxiety, or mild shortness of breath. Patients with AVNRTs are more likely to be young and female over male.

QRS complexes in AVNRTs are often narrow (<120msec), however, wide QRS complexes may be present in AVNRTs if there is a concurrent bundle branch block or Wolff-Parkinson White Syndrome. AVNRTs are often stable and do not require electric cardioversion. Signs that indicate instability and necessitate cardioversion are hypotension (SBP <90mmHg), altered mental status, or ischemic chest pain (more common if known history of ischemic heart disease). This patient lacks all of these signs and symptoms.

Treatment of AVNRT focuses on restoring the patient to normal sinus rhythm, which leads to resolution of symptoms. First-line medications for AVNRTs are short-acting AV nodal blocking agents, like adenosine (Choice A). Beta-blockers or calcium channel blockers act as second-line agents for patients who do not respond to adenosine. Metoprolol is a beta-blocker (Choice C) and Diltiazem is a calcium channel clocker (Choice D). Prior to any medications, vagal maneuvers should always be attempted first in a stable patient with AVNRT. The Valsalva maneuver (Choice B), or “bearing down,” is a commonly used vagal maneuver in the termination of AVNRTs. Other vagal maneuvers include the carotid massage or the Diving reflex (place bag of ice and water on face). Correct Answer: B

References

  • Brady W.J., & Glass III G.F. (2020). Cardiac rhythm disturbances. Tintinalli J.E., Ma O, Yealy D.M., Meckler G.D., Stapczynski J, Cline D.M., & Thomas S.H.(Eds.), Tintinalli’s Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide, 9e. McGraw-Hill. https://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=2353&sectionid=218687685
  • Burns, E. (2020). Supraventricular Tachycardia (SVT). Life in the Fast Lane. Retrieved from https://litfl.com/supraventricular-tachycardia-svt-ecg-library/

Cite this article as: Joseph Ciano, USA, "Question Of The Day #27," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, February 19, 2021, https://iem-student.org/2021/02/19/question-of-the-day-27/, date accessed: August 5, 2021

Question Of The Day #26

question of the day
qod26
38 - atrial fibrillation

Which of the following is the most appropriate next step in management for this patient’s condition?

This patient presents to the emergency department with palpitations, a narrow complex tachycardia (<120msec), and an irregularly irregular rhythm. A close look at this patient’s EKG reveals the absence of discrete P waves and QRS complexes that are spaced at varying distances from each other (most apparent in lead V6). These signs support a diagnosis of Atrial Fibrillation, or “AFib.” Atrial Fibrillation is an arrhythmia characterized by an irregularly irregular rhythm, the absence of P waves with a flat or undulating baseline, and narrow QRS complexes. Wide-QRS complexes may be present in AFib if there is a concurrent bundle branch block or Wolff-Parkinson White Syndrome. AFib is caused by the electric firing of multiple ectopic foci in the atria of the heart. This condition is triggered by a multitude of causes, including ischemic heart disease, valvular heart disease, dilated or hypertrophic cardiomyopathies (likely related to this patient’s congestive heart failure history), sepsis, hyperthyroidism, excess caffeine or alcohol intake, pulmonary embolism, and electrolyte abnormalities.

The main risk in AFib is the creation of thrombi in the atria as they fibrillate, resulting in emboli that travel to the brain and cause a stroke. The CHA2DS2VASc scoring system is used to risk stratify patients and determine if they require anticoagulation to prevent against thrombo-embolic phenomenon (i.e. stroke). This patient has a high CHA2DS2VASc score, so she would require anticoagulation. In addition to anticoagulation, A fib is treated with rate control (i.e. beta blockers or calcium channel blockers), rhythm control (i.e. anti-arrhythmic agents), or electrical cardioversion. Electrical cardioversion (choice A) is typically avoided when symptoms occur greater than 48 hours, since the risk of thrombo-emboli formation is higher in this scenario. An exception to this would be a patient with “unstable” AFib. Signs of instability in any tachyarrhythmia are hypotension, altered mental status, or ischemic chest pain. This patient lacks all of these signs and symptoms. Although this patient lacks signs of instability, this patient’s marked tachycardia should be addressed with medical treatment. General observation (Choice C) is not the best choice for this reason. Intravenous adenosine (Choice D) is the best choice for a patient with supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). This is a narrow-complex AV nodal re-entry tachycardia with rates that range from 120-280bpm. SVT also lacks discrete P waves. A key factor that differentiates A fib from SVT is that SVT has a regular rhythm, while AFib has an irregular rhythm. Intravenous metoprolol (Choice B) is the best treatment option listed in order to decrease the patient’s heart rate.

References

  • Brady W.J., & Glass III G.F. (2020). Cardiac rhythm disturbances. Tintinalli J.E., Ma O, Yealy D.M., Meckler G.D., Stapczynski J, Cline D.M., & Thomas S.H.(Eds.), Tintinalli’s Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide, 9e. McGraw-Hill. https://accessmedicine.mhmedical.com/content.aspx?bookid=2353&sectionid=218687685
  • Burns, E. (2020) Atrial Fibrillation. Life in The Fast Lane. Retrieved from https://litfl.com/atrial-fibrillation-ecg-library/

 

Cite this article as: Joseph Ciano, USA, "Question Of The Day #26," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, February 12, 2021, https://iem-student.org/2021/02/12/question-of-the-day-26/, date accessed: August 5, 2021

Drop the Beat! – Adenosine in SVT

Drop the Beat! – Adenosine in SVT

Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is defined as a dysrhythmia that originates proximal to (or ‘above’) the atrioventricular (AV) node of the heart. It commonly manifests as a regular, narrow complex (QRS interval < 120ms) tachycardia in affected patients. It is most frequently attributable to re-entrant electrical conduction through accessory pathways in the heart, with typical Electrocardiogram (ECG) findings depicting ventricular rates of 150 to 250 beats/min without the preceding P wave usually seen in sinus tachycardias. [1,2]

In the stable adult patient presenting with SVT, where no ‘red flags’ such as shock, altered mental state, ischemic chest pain or hypotension are present, management typically begins with an attempt to convert the rhythm back to its baseline sinus state using vagal manoeuvres.[3] Vagal manoeuvres such as the carotid sinus massage and the Valsalva manoeuvre are effective first-line therapies, terminating approximately 25% of spontaneous SVTs,[4] with the newer, modified Valsalva manoeuvre showing even greater efficacy of 43% conversion.[5] When these fail or are otherwise not feasible to use in patients, management involves the administration of a drug called Adenosine.

The Evolution of Adenosine Use for SVT

In 1927, studies found that the injection of extracts from cardiac tissue into animals appeared to decrease heart rates and that this effect was attributable to an ‘adenine compound’.[6] This compound was later identified as Adenosine, comprised of the purine-based nucleobase Adenine attached to a ribose sugar. Fifty years after its initial discovery, Adenosine began to emerge as a treatment for stabilizing SVTs and has remained a mainstay in its management ever since.[7]

Current guidelines recommend Adenosine for the management of SVT, usually administered through a peripheral intravenous (IV) access initially as a 6 mg bolus. Adenosine has an extremely short half-life (less than 10 seconds) and is therefore rapidly metabolized soon after it enters the body.[8] Therefore, IV dosage is commonly followed by a 20 mL rapid saline flush to facilitate the drug’s transport to cardiac tissue where it can act before being broken down into inactive metabolites. If the 6mg dose does not convert the SVT back to sinus rhythm, subsequent doses are given at 12 mg, also followed by 20-mL saline for rapid infusion.

Pro-Tip: Single syringe technique

Before we dive into the concept of the single syringe method of administering Adenosine, take a look at the segment above. How would you give 6 mg of Adenosine through an IV site, making sure a total of 20 mL saline follows right after, in enough time to make sure you don’t waste that precious 10-second half-life of Adenosine? In many places, one of the two methods are used to make this happen:

  1. Use an IV line to push Adenosine > remove syringe > push 10 mL saline using a pre-filled syringe > remove syringe > push 10mL saline using a second pre-filled syringe.
  2. Fancier places use what’s known as a stopcock, a device usually with 3 ports attached to the IV site. Adenosine syringe is attached to one port and a 10 mL saline flush is attached at a separate port. The process looks something like this: Push adenosine through stopcock port > turn stopcock to open saline port’s access to IV site > push 10 mL saline flush > push an additional 10 mL saline using second syringe or remainder of a 20 mL prefilled syringe.

Now we all know that nurses are indistinguishable from ninjas at times when handling IV medication. However, even the most experienced practitioner is not immune to the occasional stumble when switching between the various syringes and swivels required in the methods above. In fact, a study in 2018 found that, in pediatric patients, adenosine given using the stopcock method delivered suboptimal doses.[9]

In an attempt to improve administration time, a potential work-around was proposed where adenosine could be combined with the flush solution in one 20 mL syringe and pushed altogether.[10] This potentially eliminates any time wasted changing syringes and manipulating stopcocks, but does it still work the same? Fortunately, a few studies have demonstrated the feasibility of the single syringe method, with non-inferior efficacy compared to standard methods of drug administration.[11,12]

Caveats: Coffee Conundrums

Let’s talk a bit about dosage. We mentioned above that guidelines recommend starting at 6 mg and moving to 12 mg for subsequent dosages. These dosages assume uninhibited action of adenosine at its receptors which, unfortunately, may not always be the case in patients. What would inhibit adenosine’s activity, I hear you ask? You’ll want to put down that Caramel Macchiato because the answer (pause for dramatic effect) … is coffee – caffeine to be exact.

Caffeine is known to work by antagonizing adenosine receptors, thereby decreasing adenosine’s biologic effect.[13] A component in many frequently consumed beverages, such as coffee, tea, energy drinks and sodas, and with a half-life of approximately 4-5 hours, caffeine is very likely to be present in the bloodstreams of many Emergency Department patients (and doctors). A 2010 multi-centre study in Australia found that recent ingestion of caffeine less than 4 hours prior to a 6 mg adenosine bolus significantly reduced its effectiveness in treating SVT. [14]

This makes it all the more important to not only include information on any known recent beverage consumption during history taking for patients presenting with SVT, but also to potentially increase dosage for patients with a confirmed or suspected recent ingestion of caffeine. In such cases, it would be reasonable to start at 12 mg adenosine as the first dose, followed by 18 mg subsequent dosages to manage SVT.[15]

A 2010 multi-centre study in Australia found that recent ingestion of caffeine less than 4 hours prior to a 6 mg adenosine bolus significantly reduced its effectiveness in treating SVT.

References and Further Reading

  1. Bibas, L., Levi, M., & Essebag, V. (2016). Diagnosis and management of supraventricular tachycardias. CMAJ : Canadian Medical Association journal = journal de l’Association medicale canadienne, 188(17-18), E466–E473. https://doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.160079
  2. Mahtani, A. U., & Nair, D. G. (2019). Supraventricular Tachycardia. The Medical clinics of North America, 103(5), 863–879. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mcna.2019.05.007
  3. Advanced Cardiac Life Support Provider Manual, American Heart Association, Mesquite 2016
  4. Lim, S. H., Anantharaman, V., Teo, W. S., Goh, P. P., & Tan, A. (1998). Comparison of Treatment of Supraventricular Tachycardia by Valsalva Maneuver and Carotid Sinus Massage. Annals of emergency medicine, 31(1), 30–35.
  5. Appelboam, A., Reuben, A., Mann, C., Gagg, J., Ewings, P., Barton, A., Lobban, T., Dayer, M., Vickery, J., Benger, J., & REVERT trial collaborators (2015). Postural modification to the standard Valsalva manoeuvre for emergency treatment of supraventricular tachycardias (REVERT): a randomised controlled trial. Lancet (London, England), 386(10005), 1747–1753. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(15)61485-4
  6. Drury, A. N., & Szent-Györgyi, A. (1929). The physiological activity of adenine compounds with especial reference to their action upon the mammalian heart. The Journal of physiology, 68(3), 213–237. https://doi.org/10.1113/jphysiol.1929.sp002608
  7. Delacrétaz E. (2006). Clinical practice. Supraventricular tachycardia. The New England journal of medicine, 354(10), 1039–1051. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMcp051145
  8. Kazemzadeh-Narbat, M., Annabi, N., Tamayol, A., Oklu, R., Ghanem, A., & Khademhosseini, A. (2015). Adenosine-associated delivery systems. Journal of drug targeting, 23(7-8), 580–596. https://doi.org/10.3109/1061186X.2015.1058803
  9. Weberding, N. T., Saladino, R. A., Minnigh, M. B., Oberly, P. J., Tudorascu, D. L., Poloyac, S. M., & Manole, M. D. (2018). Adenosine Administration With a Stopcock Technique Delivers Lower-Than-Intended Drug Doses. Annals of emergency medicine, 71(2), 220–224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2017.09.002
  10. Hayes, B.D. (2019). ‘Trick of the Trade: Combine Adenosine with the Flush’. Academic Life in Emergency Medicine Blog Post https://www.aliem.com/trick-of-trade-combine-adenosine-single-syringe/
  11. Choi, S.C., Yoon, S.K., Kim, G.W., Hur, J.M., Baek, K.W., & Jung, Y.S. (2003). A Convenient Method of Adenosine Administration for Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia. Journal of the Korean society of emergency medicine, 14, 224-227.
  12. McDowell, M., Mokszycki, R., Greenberg, A., Hormese, M., Lomotan, N., & Lyons, N. (2020). Single-syringe Administration of Diluted Adenosine. Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 27(1), 61–63. https://doi.org/10.1111/acem.13879
  13. Ribeiro, J. A., & Sebastião, A. M. (2010). Caffeine and adenosine. Journal of Alzheimer’s disease : JAD, 20 Suppl 1, S3–S15. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-2010-1379
  14. Cabalag, M. S., Taylor, D. M., Knott, J. C., Buntine, P., Smit, D., & Meyer, A. (2010). Recent caffeine ingestion reduces adenosine efficacy in the treatment of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 17(1), 44–49. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1553-2712.2009.00616.x
  15. Hayes, B.D. (2012). ‘Is the 6-12-12 adenosine approach always correct?’ Academic Life in Emergency Medicine Blog Post https://www.aliem.com/is-6-12-12-adenosine-approach-always/
Cite this article as: Mohammad Anzal Rehman, UAE, "Drop the Beat! – Adenosine in SVT," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, September 14, 2020, https://iem-student.org/2020/09/14/adenosine-in-svt/, date accessed: August 5, 2021

Question Of The Day #10

question of the day
qod10 palpitation

Which of the following is the most appropriate next step in management for this patient’s condition?

This patient has a narrow-complex tachycardia with a regular rhythm. A narrow QRS complex is defined as a QRS interval less than 120msec. This is a normal finding. The differential diagnoses for regular narrow complex tachycardia include sinus tachycardia, atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter, and supraventricular tachycardia (“SVT”). SVTs are typically associated with narrow QRS complexes, unless there is a concurrent bundle branch block, other aberrant conduction, or the existence of electrical accessory pathways as in Wolff Parkinson White (WPW) syndrome. The heart rate of an SVT can vary from 140-280 beats/min. Intravenous Adenosine (Choice A) is a hallmark of SVT treatment, however, Adenosine is given after vagal maneuvers have been attempted and have failed. Synchronized cardioversion (Choice B) is a last-ditch effort treatment in a patient with SVT. Vagal maneuvers and medications are attempted prior to using cardioversion. However, if the patient is hypotensive, cardioversion should be employed. Intravenous Amiodarone (Choice C), beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, or other antiarrhythmics can be used to terminate SVTs if vagal maneuvers and adenosine are not effective. Vagal maneuvers (Choice D), such as the Valsalva maneuver (“bearing down”) or carotid massage, are the initial treatment for SVTs. Correct Answer: D 

References

Burns, E. (2019, March 30). Supraventricular Tachycardia (SVT). Life in the Fast Lane. https://litfl.com/supraventricular-tachycardia-svt-ecg-library/

Nickson, C. (2019, March 24). Narrow Complex Tachycardia. Life in the Fast Lane. https://litfl.com/narrow-complex-tachycardia/

Cite this article as: Joseph Ciano, USA, "Question Of The Day #10," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, August 28, 2020, https://iem-student.org/2020/08/28/question-of-the-day-10/, date accessed: August 5, 2021