Question Of The Day #5

question of the day
qod 5 trauma

Which of the following is the most appropriate next step in management for this patient‘s condition?

This patient has sustained blunt abdominal trauma from his seat belt. This is indicated by the linear area of ecchymoses, known as a “seat belt sign”. This is a worrisome physical exam finding that should raise a concern about a severe intra-abdominal injury. All trauma patients presenting to the emergency department should be assessed using an organized approach, including a primary survey (“ABCs”) followed by a secondary survey (more detailed physical examination). The FAST (Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma) examination is part of the primary survey in a trauma patient. Some sources abbreviate the primary survey in trauma as “ABCDEF”, which stands for Airway, Breathing, Circulation, Disability, Exposure, FAST exam. The primary survey attempts to identify any life-threatening diagnoses that need to be addressed in a time-sensitive manner. Examples include cardiac tamponade, tension pneumothorax, and intra-abdominal bleeding. The FAST exam includes 4 basic views: the right upper quadrant view (liver and right kidney), pelvis view (bladder), left upper quadrant view (spleen and left kidney), and cardiac/subxiphoid view (heart). An E-FAST, or extended FAST, includes the four standard FAST views plus bilateral views of the lungs to evaluate for pneumothorax. An abnormal FAST exam demonstrates the presence of free fluid on ultrasound. In the setting of trauma, free fluid is assumed to be blood. Free fluid on ultrasound appears black, or anechoic (indicated by yellow arrows in below image).

question of the day 5 trauma

The space between the liver and right kidney (“Morrison’s Pouch”) is often the first location or blood to accumulate in a patient with intra-abdominal bleeding. Trauma patients who are hemodynamically unstable with a positive FAST exam (this patient) should go to the operating room for emergent exploratory laparotomy (Choice C) to determine the source of their bleeding. Performing a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis (Choice A) would be the correct answer if the patient was hemodynamically stable and had a positive FAST exam. Allowing this patient to leave the emergency department for a CT scan would be dangerous as this patient could rapidly decompensate. Performing a Diagnostic Peritoneal Lavage (Choice B) would be the correct answer if the patient was hemodynamically stable but had a normal FAST exam. An emergent thoracotomy (Choice D) is more typically performed in patients with penetrating trauma who have cardiac arrest shortly before presenting to the emergency department. This intervention attempts to identify and treat any reversible causes of cardiac arrest. Correct Answer: C

References

Butler, M. (2015). “Boring question: What is the role of the FAST exam for blunt abdominal trauma?” Canadiem. https://canadiem.org/boring-question-what-is-the-role-of-the-fast-exam-for-blunt-abdominal-trauma/

Franzen, D. (2016). “FAST examination”. SAEM. https://www.saem.org/cdem/education/online-education/m3-curriculum/bedside-ultrasonagraphy/fast-exam

Cite this article as: Joseph Ciano, USA, "Question Of The Day #5," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, July 22, 2020, https://iem-student.org/2020/07/22/question-of-the-day-5/, date accessed: October 20, 2020

NEXUS Criteria

nexus criteria
Cite this article as: Keerthi Gondy, USA, "NEXUS Criteria," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, July 6, 2020, https://iem-student.org/2020/07/06/nexus-criteria/, date accessed: October 20, 2020

The First Nexus Criteria Reference

Hoffman JR, Wolfson AB, Todd K, Mower WR. Selective cervical spine radiography in blunt trauma: methodology of the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS). Ann Emerg Med. 1998;32(4):461-469. doi:10.1016/s0196-0644(98)70176-3

Triads in Medicine – Rapid Review for Medical Students

triads in medicine

One of the most convenient ways of learning and remembering the main components of disease and identifying a medical condition on an exam are Triads, and medical students/interns/residents swear by them.

Be it a question during rounds, a multiple-choice exam question to be solved, or even in medical practice, the famous triads help physicians recall important characteristics and clinical features of a disease or treatment in an instant.

Since exam season is here, this could serve as a rapid review to recall the most common medical conditions.

While there are a vast number of triads/pentads available online, I have listed the most important (high-yy) ones that every student would be asked about at least once in the duration of their course.

1) Lethal Triad also known as The Trauma Triad of Death
Hypothermia + Coagulopathy + Metabolic Acidosis

2) Beck’s Triad of Cardiac Tamponade
Muffled heart sounds + Distended neck veins + Hypotension

3) Virchow’s Triad – Venous Thrombosis
Hypercoagulability + stasis + endothelial damage

4) Charcot’s Triad – Ascending Cholangitis
Fever with rigors + Right upper quadrant pain + Jaundice

5) Cushing’s Triad – Raised Intracranial Pressure
Bradycardia + Irregular respiration + Hypertension

6) Triad of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Severe Abdominal/Back Pain + Hypotension + Pulsatile Abdominal mass

7) Reactive Arthritis
Can’t See (Conjunctivitis) + Can’t Pee (Urethritis) + Can’t Climb a Tree (Arthritis)

8) Triad of Opioid Overdose
Pinpoint pupils + Respiratory Depression + CNS Depression

9) Hakims Triad – Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus
Gait Disturbance + Dementia + Urinary Incontinence

10) Horner’s Syndrome Triad
Ptosis + Miosis + Anydrosis

11) Mackler’s Triad – Oesophageal Perforation (Boerhaave Syndrome)
Vomiting + Lower Thoracic Pain + Subcutaneous Emphysema

12) Pheochromocytoma
Palpitations + Headache + Perspiration (Diaphoresis)

13) Leriche Syndrome
Buttock claudication + Impotence + Symmetrical Atrophy of bilateral lower extremities

14) Rigler’s Triad – Gallstone ileus
Gallstones + Pneumobilia + Small bowel obstruction

15) Whipple’s Triad – Insulinoma
Hypoglycemic attack + Low glucose + Resolving of the attack on glucose administration

16) Meniere’s Disease
Tinnitus + Vertigo + Hearing loss

17) Wernicke’s Encephalopathy- Thiamine Deficiency
Confusion + Ophthalmoplegia + Ataxia

18) Unhappy Triad – Knee Injury
Injury to Anterior Cruciate Ligament + Medial collateral ligament + Medial or Lateral Meniscus

19) Henoch Schonlein Purpura
Purpura + Abdominal pain + Joint pain

20) Meigs Syndrome
Benign ovarian tumor + pleural effusion + ascites

21) Felty’s Syndrome
Rheumatoid Arthritis + Splenomegaly + Neutropenia

22) Cauda Equina Syndrome
Low back pain + Bowel/Bladder Dysfunction + Saddle Anesthesia

23) Meningitis
Fever + Headache + Neck Stiffness

24) Wolf Parkinson White Syndrome
Delta Waves + Short PR Interval + Wide QRS Complex

25) Neurogenic Shock
Bradycardia + Hypotension + Hypothermia

Further Reading

Cite this article as: Sumaiya Hafiz, UAE, "Triads in Medicine – Rapid Review for Medical Students," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, June 12, 2020, https://iem-student.org/2020/06/12/triads-in-medicine/, date accessed: October 20, 2020

Selected Orthopaedic Problems and Injuries section is added.

Selected Orthopaedic Problems and Injuries

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Seat Belt Sign

722.1 - seat belt sign 1

A 32 years old male was involved in an MVC where he was in the front seat as a passenger and had his seatbelt on. It was a direct front collision. The patient is stable. He is in moderate pain. Displacement of the lower part of the sternum as well as a retrosternal hematoma was noted after the ED care.

Trauma care is very important as globally recognized. It is also important to prevent injury. Seat belts are doing their part to prevent further injury. However, they may not be protective, or even cause injury if the other prevention measures were not applied such as speed limit.

This case shows dramatic skin lesions caused by the seatbelt. You can see various images of this in the clinical image archive (just click the image). What seatbelt sign says to us? INVESTIGATE FURTHER INNER INJURY… This patient has neck, chest, abdomen skin findings. Therefore, vascular injuries (aorta, vein), viscus injuries (perforation, bleeding), solid organ lacerations (spleen, liver, pancreas), contusions (cardiac) in the neck, chest, and abdomen should be investigated.

To learn more about trauma management read below chapter.

Multiple Trauma by Pia Jerot and Gregor Prosen by Dan O’Brien

Electrical injury

In case you didn’t encounter electrical injury today!

685.1 - electrical injury entry

The above picture shows entry wounds of electrical injury. One of the important hints is DO NOT DELAY TO TAKE OFF RINGS for any hand injury!

684.4 - electrical injury exit

The above picture shows exit wounds of the same patient. 

iEM Education Project Team uploads many clinical picture and videos to the Flickr and YouTube. These images are free to use in education. You can also support this global EM education initiative by providing your resources. Sharing is caring!

Red urine

684.1 - electrical injury - rhabdomyolysis

In case you didn’t encounter a construction worker who presented with high voltage electrical injury today!

683.4 - electrical burn entry

iEM Education Project Team uploads many clinical picture and videos to the Flickr and YouTube. These images are free to use in education. You can also support this global EM education initiative by providing your resources. Sharing is caring!

Unilateral or bilateral?

644 - C-spine dislocation

In case you didn’t encounter another trauma today!

You are working in a rural hospital. A 55-year-old female was brought to the ED by EMS. She was found at home, lying on the ground, in front of the stairs. She is vitally stable but unconscious (GCS: E1, V:2, M:3). You applied trauma surveys. After inline stabilization, you intubated the patient. The facility does not have a CT scan, and you order standard X-ray series for trauma including c-spine.

What are abnormal findings in this x-ray?

Facet dislocation? Unilateral or Bilateral?

iEM Education Project Team uploads many clinical picture and videos to the Flickr and YouTube. These images are free to use in education. You can also support this global EM education initiative by providing your resources. Sharing is caring!

Pelvic X-ray interpretation

628.6 - Figure 6 - sacroiliac and symphysis pubis joints

How to read pelvic x-rays chapter written by Sara Nikolić and Gregor Prosen from Slovenia is just uploaded to the Website!

Head CT Interpretation – No Worries!

Hip Dislocation

605 - Hip dislocation

Reduction of Common Fractures and Dislocations chapter written by Dejvid Ahmetović and Gregor Prosen from Slovenia is just uploaded to the Website! with selection of various videos and images.

A kid with wrist pain!

In case you didn’t encounter a kid with wrist pain today!

Pediatric fractures affecting growth plate are classified with Salter-Harris classification. It is from I to V. 

What is your opinion about below x-ray? I, II, III, IV or V?

Please give your answer at the comment box below.

428.3 - salter harris 2

iEM Education Project Team uploads many clinical picture and videos to the Flickr and YouTube. These images are free to use in education. You can also support this global EM education initiative by providing your resources. Sharing is caring!