Self-Directed Learning

  • Diagnose your learning needs

    What I don’t know? What is important for me to know? i.e., “I’m not confident enough to quickly read and interpret an ECG with acute conditions - I think this is important to know.”

  • Formulate your learning goals

    What I expect to learn on this rotation? i.e., “I want to learn how to read an ECG in the ED effectively.”i.e., “I’m not confident enough to quickly read and interpret an ECG with acute conditions - I think this is important to know.”

  • Explore resources

    What resources are available for me to learn? Are there lectures available? FOAMed? i.e., “The medical staff are accessible, there are weekly ECG case discussions at the ED and FOAMed resources as the ECG library in the LITFL.”

  • Choose the learning strategies

    What is the best method for me? i.e., “I have a good visual memory, I may find it easier to take a look at the ECG library and then to discuss with my professor when the cases show up.”

  • Evaluate the outcomes

    Did I achieve my goals? i.e., “At the end of my rotation, I can successfully identify major acute conditions on an ECG.” After thinking about the outcomes you had and the goals you have achieved, you can identify your needs and establish learning goals once again.

The technique can sound quite simple – and it is! The hard part is to have it on your mind when you are about to start a new clinical rotation or observership, but it becomes part of your routine with a little time.

Reference

Education Theory Made Practical: Volume 1; Published by Academic Life in Emergency Medicine, San Francisco, California, USA, 2017  chap 7, pgs 59 – 69

Cite this article as: Arthur Martins, "Self-Directed Learning," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, July 3, 2019, https://iem-student.org/2019/07/03/self-directed-learning/, date accessed: November 12, 2019

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