Journal Club 11/29/21: Ethics of Humanitarian Work

POCUS in Resource-Limited Settings presented by Holly A. Farkosh

POCUS, or point-of-care ultrasound, is a focused exam performed and interpreted by an examiner usually at the bedside, that must answer a specific question (is there a pleural effusion, yes or no?). The diagnosis must also be 1) relevant to consecutive treatment decision-making and 2) easily and accurately recognizable by the physician applying the US without extensive training.

There are many advantages to using POCUS in a resource-limited setting, including but not limited to: 

– Portability; relatively inexpensive starting at $2000

– Limited access to other diagnostic imaging equipment (XR, CT, MRI–all of which require additional training to read and use/operate)

– Rapid, noninvasive

– No ionizing radiation exposure

– Improves success and safety of bedside procedures

– Can easily be repeated, quickly, and without increasing radiation exposure, especially if clinical status or physical exam findings change 

– Particularly cost-effective (in the United States) in pediatric appendicitis and trauma (found to have decreased time to OR, decreased CT scans in the pediatric population, shortened length of hospital stay)

Some of the disadvantages include:

– Requirement of formal training

– Issue of how to power/charge and reliable access to this

– Handheld US requires a smartphone

– Supplies (US gel)

– Upkeep and repair

– Image portability (inability to print or save images for patients to share with other healthcare providers)

– Ethical considerations? 

Tying it all Together: Ethical Considerations for POCUS in Resource-Limited Settings

– Cost-effectiveness: some resources are deemed too expensive

– Resource limitations and differences in standard of care between the United States and other countries 

– Practitioners who may be teaching US may have limited knowledge of practicing in resource-limited settings, or there may be discrepancies in both knowledge of using the technology/resources available as well as the common presenting diseases in that region

– Sustainability: in relation to implementing training programs– what happens after instructors leave? Requires adequate planning for system integration and ongoing supervision and skill maintenance

– Limited capacity and inconsistent availability of follow-up care; screening without available treatment

Discussion Questions:

  • What other ethical considerations are there to implementing POCUS in resource-limited settings?

       – Advantage: lack of need for significant infrastructure; skills can quickly be acquired; real-time video training/support between the United States and other countries

        – Limited support for continued supervision/continual mentorship on improving skills; sustainability of training programs

        – Potential costs of training

  • What to do when you come across findings not consistent with physical exam– how to advocate for further diagnostics/evaluation?
  • Using US for central lines: lack of US availability; no formal US training; need to teach how to use US, but also important to teach things such as sterile prep/technique

Why do we have a desire to work in Global Health? By Cody Ritz

Chapter nine from Reimagining Global Health: An Introduction aims to explore a few different answers to this complex question. It’s possible that many of our desires to work in Global EM stem from some of the moral frameworks or values systems presented in these pages. The chapter lays them out as such:

Depending on your own personal motivations, you may identify with one, many, or none of these moral frameworks or value systems. This list is not meant to be exhaustive, and it barely scratches the surface of the many nuances included in each of these philosophies. While we could go to much greater lengths to wholly explore these schools of thought, I believe the greatest benefit in naming them is not solely for the purpose of categorization. Rather, by taking the time to compare these sources of motivation, we can equip ourselves with a vocabulary and mindset that helps give form to our innermost determinations. While this form develops, we can begin to understand the foundations of our own interest to work in not only global health but medicine at large. As we come to better understand ourselves, let us hope this allows us to better understand others as well.

Discussion Points:

  • With which of these frameworks/value systems do you identify personally? – One? Multiple? None of them at all? – and how has that framework informed your own perspective and approach to global health?
  • Imagine that you’re in an interview for a position you want in the future and the interviewer asks—Why do you have these interests in global health when there is already great need within your own backyard?— How do you respond? In what ways could you explain your motivations within the frameworks discussed in this chapter?

Wrap up!

As you can imagine, our mentees had a wonderful discussion surrounding these three topics! We are thrilled to be able to present a brief summary of their work here. Please stay tuned for details about our upcoming meetings.  Connect with us through one of our contact options listed below if you are interested in attending!

Thank you to our authors and presenters!

Holly Farkosh, MS4

Holly Farkosh, MS4

Marshall University School of Medicine

Cody Ritz, MS2

Cody Ritz, MS2

Drexel University College of Medicine

Keep in Touch:

Cite this article as: Global EM Student Leadership Program, "Journal Club 11/29/21: Ethics of Humanitarian Work," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, April 6, 2022, https://iem-student.org/2022/04/06/journal-club-11-29-21-ethics-of-humanitarian-work/, date accessed: July 2, 2022

Journal Club 11/08/21: Resource Equity in a Pandemic

The Global Burden of Schistosomiasis presented by Farah Mechref

Endemic in 74 countries across Africa, the Middle East, South America, and Asia, schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by flatworms or blood flukes known as schistosomes. About 440 million individuals are infected with these trematodes, which reside in the blood vessels of their definitive host and lead to different clinical manifestations depending on the species. In regions endemic for schistosomiasis, the most prevalent form of the disease is
chronic schistosomiasis, resulting from repeated immunological reactions to eggs trapped in organ tissues. Infection begins when individuals enter bodies of water that contain contaminated snails that have released infectious cercariae. These cercariae penetrate the skin of the human host and produce an allergic dermatitis at the site of entry or a “swimmer’s itch.” Antigens are then released from their eggs, which stimulates a granulomatous reaction composed of T cells, macrophages, and eosinophils, resulting in the clinical disease. 

Acute schistosomiasis typically presents with sudden onset of fever, malaise, myalgia, headache, fatigue, and abdominal pain lasting 2–10 weeks, with eosinophilia noted on lab findings. Chronic infection cause granulomatous reactions and fibrosis in affected organs, which results in clinical manifestations
that include: 

-In S. mansoni and S. japonicum: upper abdominal discomfort that then shows palpable, nodular hepato-spenlomegaly with eventual development of portal hypertension from fibrosis of portal vessels and resulting ascites and hematemesis from lethal esophageal varices.

-In S. haematobium: hematuria, which is so endemic that it’s thought to be a natural sign of puberty for boys and confused with menses in girls, with eventual development of squamous-cell carcinoma of the bladder.

Currently, the only control measures available include (1) mass treatment with Praziquantel (Biltricide) in communities where schistosomiasis is endemic, (2) introduction of public hygiene programs to provide safe water supplies and sanitary disposal of stool and urine, (3) snail eradication programs using molluscicides, and (4) vaccination development to create a more durable and sustained reduction in transmission.

Discussion Questions:

  • Knowledge of transmission and preventative measures play an important role in schistosomiasis control, what other endemic conditions could be better tackled with improved patient education?
  • With 230 million actively infected patients and another 200 million with latent infections, is a vaccine worth the resource distribution or should funding go towards expanding the anti-parasitic classes available for treatment? 

Resource Equity in a Disease Outbreak by Alison Neely

The Ebola virus disease of 2013-2016, centered in West Africa, was considered one of the most threatening cases of infectious disease outbreak in modern history up until the emergence of Covid-19 in 2019. Due to the high case fatality rate of Ebola, the core element of the outbreak response was effective case identification and rapid isolation; treatment centers were quickly overwhelmed and experienced limited bed supply and staff time. A study drawing from interviews with senior healthcare personnel involved in this Ebola outbreak response aimed to identify the ethical issues involved in such a response and to create a framework of ethical guiding principles for future responses.

The framework proposed after analysis of the participants’ interviews was split into four categories: community engagement, experimental therapeutic interventions, clinical trial designs and informed consent. Community engagement stood out as a key element both in the framework and in the journal club discussion that followed. Engagement can include promotion of collaboration and open dialogue, incorporation of community insights into decision-making processes, encouragement of transparency, building trust, and reflecting on context-specific cultural values. As future physicians with special interest in global medicine, these ideas of respecting cultural context and complete inclusion of the local community in response efforts were highlighted as very relevant to our future practice.

Discussion Points:

  • Have the principles presented here been followed in the global response to the Covid-19 pandemic?
  • Our discussion also focused on the parallels and differences between this Ebola response and the global response to the Covid-19 pandemic, calling attention to the ways that the response both followed and diverged from the framework presented in this article. As the idea of a disease outbreak has become part of daily conversation in the last 2 years, investigations and discussions such as this will become increasingly relevant and important. We also touched on the idea that our global response to Covid-19 may have been very different, and potentially weaker, if the Ebola outbreak had not occurred when it did.
 

Wrap up!

As you can imagine, our mentees had a wonderful discussion surrounding these three topics! We are thrilled to be able to present a brief summary of their work here. Please stay tuned for details about our upcoming meetings.  Connect with us through one of our contact options listed below if you are interested in attending!

Thank you to our authors and presenters!

Farah Mechref, MS4

Farah Mechref, MS4

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Alison Neely, MS4

Alison Neely, MS4

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Keep in Touch:

Cite this article as: Global EM Student Leadership Program, "Journal Club 11/08/21: Resource Equity in a Pandemic," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, February 23, 2022, https://iem-student.org/2022/02/23/resource-equity-in-a-pandemic/, date accessed: July 2, 2022

Research – Final Thoughts And Recommendations

final thoughts and recommendations

In this educational series, iEM Education Project interviewed Prof. Fikri Abu-Zidan, a world-renowned expert and researcher on trauma, POCUS, and disaster management. He shares his 40 years of experience as a clinical researcher with the young generation of doctors.

The series name is FUNDAMENTALS OF RESEARCH IN MEDICINE and will include various aspects of research. We hope you will enjoy listening to the advice of Prof. Abu-Zidan.

The 19th episode is “Final Thoughts And Recommendations”

Professor Fikri Abu-Zidan, the head of the Trauma Group at United Arab Emirates University, is an Acute Care Surgeon who graduated (MD) from Aleppo University (Syria) in 1981 and was awarded the FRCS, Glasgow, Scotland in 1987.  He achieved his PhD in Trauma and Disaster Medicine from Linkoping University (Sweden) in 1995 and obtained his Postgraduate Diploma of Applied Statistics from Massey University (New Zealand) (1999). His clinical experience included treating war injured patients during the Second Gulf War (1990). He has been promoting the use of Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) for more than thirty years in which he is a World Leader. Furthermore, he is an international expert on trauma experimental methodology developing novel clinically relevant animal models. Establishing experimental surgical research in Auckland University, New Zealand, has led to a strong successful PhD Program.  

He has made major contributions to trauma management, education and research in Kuwait, Sweden, New Zealand, Australia and UAE.  He authored more than 415 publications, presented more than 600 invited lectures and abstracts, and received more than 40 national and international awards. He is serving as the Statistics Editor of World Journal of Emergency Surgery and European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery. 

Cite this article as: Arif Alper Cevik, "Research – Final Thoughts And Recommendations," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, February 21, 2022, https://iem-student.org/2022/02/21/research-final-thoughts-and-recommendations/, date accessed: July 2, 2022

Answering Reviewers’ Comments

answering reviewers' comments

In this educational series, iEM Education Project interviewed Prof. Fikri Abu-Zidan, a world-renowned expert and researcher on trauma, POCUS, and disaster management. He shares his 40 years of experience as a clinical researcher with the young generation of doctors.

The series name is FUNDAMENTALS OF RESEARCH IN MEDICINE and will include various aspects of research. We hope you will enjoy listening to the advice of Prof. Abu-Zidan.

The 18th episode is “Answering Reviewer’s Comments”

Professor Fikri Abu-Zidan, the head of the Trauma Group at United Arab Emirates University, is an Acute Care Surgeon who graduated (MD) from Aleppo University (Syria) in 1981 and was awarded the FRCS, Glasgow, Scotland in 1987.  He achieved his PhD in Trauma and Disaster Medicine from Linkoping University (Sweden) in 1995 and obtained his Postgraduate Diploma of Applied Statistics from Massey University (New Zealand) (1999). His clinical experience included treating war injured patients during the Second Gulf War (1990). He has been promoting the use of Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) for more than thirty years in which he is a World Leader. Furthermore, he is an international expert on trauma experimental methodology developing novel clinically relevant animal models. Establishing experimental surgical research in Auckland University, New Zealand, has led to a strong successful PhD Program.  

He has made major contributions to trauma management, education and research in Kuwait, Sweden, New Zealand, Australia and UAE.  He authored more than 415 publications, presented more than 600 invited lectures and abstracts, and received more than 40 national and international awards. He is serving as the Statistics Editor of World Journal of Emergency Surgery and European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery. 

Cite this article as: Arif Alper Cevik, "Answering Reviewers’ Comments," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, February 14, 2022, https://iem-student.org/2022/02/14/answering-reviewers-comments/, date accessed: July 2, 2022

Submitting A Manuscript To A Journal

submitting manuscript to a journal

In this educational series, iEM Education Project interviewed Prof. Fikri Abu-Zidan, a world-renowned expert and researcher on trauma, POCUS, and disaster management. He shares his 40 years of experience as a clinical researcher with the young generation of doctors.

The series name is FUNDAMENTALS OF RESEARCH IN MEDICINE and will include various aspects of research. We hope you will enjoy listening to the advice of Prof. Abu-Zidan.

The 17th episode is “Submitting A Manuscript To A Journal”

Professor Fikri Abu-Zidan, the head of the Trauma Group at United Arab Emirates University, is an Acute Care Surgeon who graduated (MD) from Aleppo University (Syria) in 1981 and was awarded the FRCS, Glasgow, Scotland in 1987.  He achieved his PhD in Trauma and Disaster Medicine from Linkoping University (Sweden) in 1995 and obtained his Postgraduate Diploma of Applied Statistics from Massey University (New Zealand) (1999). His clinical experience included treating war injured patients during the Second Gulf War (1990). He has been promoting the use of Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) for more than thirty years in which he is a World Leader. Furthermore, he is an international expert on trauma experimental methodology developing novel clinically relevant animal models. Establishing experimental surgical research in Auckland University, New Zealand, has led to a strong successful PhD Program.  

He has made major contributions to trauma management, education and research in Kuwait, Sweden, New Zealand, Australia and UAE.  He authored more than 415 publications, presented more than 600 invited lectures and abstracts, and received more than 40 national and international awards. He is serving as the Statistics Editor of World Journal of Emergency Surgery and European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery. 

Cite this article as: Arif Alper Cevik, "Submitting A Manuscript To A Journal," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, February 7, 2022, https://iem-student.org/2022/02/07/submitting-a-manuscript-to-a-journal/, date accessed: July 2, 2022

Selecting The Right Journal

Selecting the right journal

In this educational series, iEM Education Project interviewed Prof. Fikri Abu-Zidan, a world-renowned expert and researcher on trauma, POCUS, and disaster management. He shares his 40 years of experience as a clinical researcher with the young generation of doctors.

The series name is FUNDAMENTALS OF RESEARCH IN MEDICINE and will include various aspects of research. We hope you will enjoy listening to the advice of Prof. Abu-Zidan.

The 16th episode is “Selecting The Right Journal”

Professor Fikri Abu-Zidan, the head of the Trauma Group at United Arab Emirates University, is an Acute Care Surgeon who graduated (MD) from Aleppo University (Syria) in 1981 and was awarded the FRCS, Glasgow, Scotland in 1987.  He achieved his PhD in Trauma and Disaster Medicine from Linkoping University (Sweden) in 1995 and obtained his Postgraduate Diploma of Applied Statistics from Massey University (New Zealand) (1999). His clinical experience included treating war injured patients during the Second Gulf War (1990). He has been promoting the use of Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) for more than thirty years in which he is a World Leader. Furthermore, he is an international expert on trauma experimental methodology developing novel clinically relevant animal models. Establishing experimental surgical research in Auckland University, New Zealand, has led to a strong successful PhD Program.  

He has made major contributions to trauma management, education and research in Kuwait, Sweden, New Zealand, Australia and UAE.  He authored more than 415 publications, presented more than 600 invited lectures and abstracts, and received more than 40 national and international awards. He is serving as the Statistics Editor of World Journal of Emergency Surgery and European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery. 

Cite this article as: Arif Alper Cevik, "Selecting The Right Journal," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, January 31, 2022, https://iem-student.org/2022/01/31/selecting-the-right-journal/, date accessed: July 2, 2022

Fine-Tuning Your Manuscript

fine-tuning your manuscript

In this educational series, iEM Education Project interviewed Prof. Fikri Abu-Zidan, a world-renowned expert and researcher on trauma, POCUS, and disaster management. He shares his 40 years of experience as a clinical researcher with the young generation of doctors.

The series name is FUNDAMENTALS OF RESEARCH IN MEDICINE and will include various aspects of research. We hope you will enjoy listening to the advice of Prof. Abu-Zidan.

The 15th episode is “Fine-Tuning Your Manuscript”

Professor Fikri Abu-Zidan, the head of the Trauma Group at United Arab Emirates University, is an Acute Care Surgeon who graduated (MD) from Aleppo University (Syria) in 1981 and was awarded the FRCS, Glasgow, Scotland in 1987.  He achieved his PhD in Trauma and Disaster Medicine from Linkoping University (Sweden) in 1995 and obtained his Postgraduate Diploma of Applied Statistics from Massey University (New Zealand) (1999). His clinical experience included treating war injured patients during the Second Gulf War (1990). He has been promoting the use of Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) for more than thirty years in which he is a World Leader. Furthermore, he is an international expert on trauma experimental methodology developing novel clinically relevant animal models. Establishing experimental surgical research in Auckland University, New Zealand, has led to a strong successful PhD Program.  

He has made major contributions to trauma management, education and research in Kuwait, Sweden, New Zealand, Australia and UAE.  He authored more than 415 publications, presented more than 600 invited lectures and abstracts, and received more than 40 national and international awards. He is serving as the Statistics Editor of World Journal of Emergency Surgery and European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery. 

Cite this article as: Arif Alper Cevik, "Fine-Tuning Your Manuscript," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, January 24, 2022, https://iem-student.org/2022/01/24/fine-tuning-your-manuscript/, date accessed: July 2, 2022

How To Write A Manuscript

how to write a manuscript

In this educational series, iEM Education Project interviewed Prof. Fikri Abu-Zidan, a world-renowned expert and researcher on trauma, POCUS, and disaster management. He shares his 40 years of experience as a clinical researcher with the young generation of doctors.

The series name is FUNDAMENTALS OF RESEARCH IN MEDICINE and will include various aspects of research. We hope you will enjoy listening to the advice of Prof. Abu-Zidan.

The 14th episode is “How to write a manuscript”

Professor Fikri Abu-Zidan, the head of the Trauma Group at United Arab Emirates University, is an Acute Care Surgeon who graduated (MD) from Aleppo University (Syria) in 1981 and was awarded the FRCS, Glasgow, Scotland in 1987.  He achieved his PhD in Trauma and Disaster Medicine from Linkoping University (Sweden) in 1995 and obtained his Postgraduate Diploma of Applied Statistics from Massey University (New Zealand) (1999). His clinical experience included treating war injured patients during the Second Gulf War (1990). He has been promoting the use of Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) for more than thirty years in which he is a World Leader. Furthermore, he is an international expert on trauma experimental methodology developing novel clinically relevant animal models. Establishing experimental surgical research in Auckland University, New Zealand, has led to a strong successful PhD Program.  

He has made major contributions to trauma management, education and research in Kuwait, Sweden, New Zealand, Australia and UAE.  He authored more than 415 publications, presented more than 600 invited lectures and abstracts, and received more than 40 national and international awards. He is serving as the Statistics Editor of World Journal of Emergency Surgery and European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery. 

Cite this article as: Arif Alper Cevik, "How To Write A Manuscript," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, January 17, 2022, https://iem-student.org/2022/01/17/how-to-write-a-manuscript/, date accessed: July 2, 2022

Critical Appraisal Of An Article

critical appraisal of an article

In this educational series, iEM Education Project interviewed Prof. Fikri Abu-Zidan, a world-renowned expert and researcher on trauma, POCUS, and disaster management. He shares his 40 years of experience as a clinical researcher with the young generation of doctors.

The series name is FUNDAMENTALS OF RESEARCH IN MEDICINE and will include various aspects of research. We hope you will enjoy listening to the advice of Prof. Abu-Zidan.

The 13th episode is “Critical appraisal of an article”

Professor Fikri Abu-Zidan, the head of the Trauma Group at United Arab Emirates University, is an Acute Care Surgeon who graduated (MD) from Aleppo University (Syria) in 1981 and was awarded the FRCS, Glasgow, Scotland in 1987.  He achieved his PhD in Trauma and Disaster Medicine from Linkoping University (Sweden) in 1995 and obtained his Postgraduate Diploma of Applied Statistics from Massey University (New Zealand) (1999). His clinical experience included treating war injured patients during the Second Gulf War (1990). He has been promoting the use of Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) for more than thirty years in which he is a World Leader. Furthermore, he is an international expert on trauma experimental methodology developing novel clinically relevant animal models. Establishing experimental surgical research in Auckland University, New Zealand, has led to a strong successful PhD Program.  

He has made major contributions to trauma management, education and research in Kuwait, Sweden, New Zealand, Australia and UAE.  He authored more than 415 publications, presented more than 600 invited lectures and abstracts, and received more than 40 national and international awards. He is serving as the Statistics Editor of World Journal of Emergency Surgery and European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery. 

Cite this article as: Arif Alper Cevik, "Critical Appraisal Of An Article," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, January 10, 2022, https://iem-student.org/2022/01/10/critical-appraisal-of-an-article/, date accessed: July 2, 2022

How To Present Your Research

how to present your research

In this educational series, iEM Education Project interviewed Prof. Fikri Abu-Zidan, a world-renowned expert and researcher on trauma, POCUS, and disaster management. He shares his 40 years of experience as a clinical researcher with the young generation of doctors.

The series name is FUNDAMENTALS OF RESEARCH IN MEDICINE and will include various aspects of research. We hope you will enjoy listening to the advice of Prof. Abu-Zidan.

The 12th episode is “How to present your research”

Professor Fikri Abu-Zidan, the head of the Trauma Group at United Arab Emirates University, is an Acute Care Surgeon who graduated (MD) from Aleppo University (Syria) in 1981 and was awarded the FRCS, Glasgow, Scotland in 1987.  He achieved his PhD in Trauma and Disaster Medicine from Linkoping University (Sweden) in 1995 and obtained his Postgraduate Diploma of Applied Statistics from Massey University (New Zealand) (1999). His clinical experience included treating war injured patients during the Second Gulf War (1990). He has been promoting the use of Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) for more than thirty years in which he is a World Leader. Furthermore, he is an international expert on trauma experimental methodology developing novel clinically relevant animal models. Establishing experimental surgical research in Auckland University, New Zealand, has led to a strong successful PhD Program.  

He has made major contributions to trauma management, education and research in Kuwait, Sweden, New Zealand, Australia and UAE.  He authored more than 415 publications, presented more than 600 invited lectures and abstracts, and received more than 40 national and international awards. He is serving as the Statistics Editor of World Journal of Emergency Surgery and European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery. 

Cite this article as: Arif Alper Cevik, "How To Present Your Research," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, January 3, 2022, https://iem-student.org/2022/01/03/how-to-present-your-research/, date accessed: July 2, 2022

How To Analyse Your Study Data

data analysis 1

In this educational series, iEM Education Project interviewed Prof. Fikri Abu-Zidan, a world-renowned expert and researcher on trauma, POCUS, and disaster management. He shares his 40 years of experience as a clinical researcher with the young generation of doctors.

The series name is FUNDAMENTALS OF RESEARCH IN MEDICINE and will include various aspects of research. We hope you will enjoy listening to the advice of Prof. Abu-Zidan.

The 11th episode is “How to analyse your study data”

Professor Fikri Abu-Zidan, the head of the Trauma Group at United Arab Emirates University, is an Acute Care Surgeon who graduated (MD) from Aleppo University (Syria) in 1981 and was awarded the FRCS, Glasgow, Scotland in 1987.  He achieved his PhD in Trauma and Disaster Medicine from Linkoping University (Sweden) in 1995 and obtained his Postgraduate Diploma of Applied Statistics from Massey University (New Zealand) (1999). His clinical experience included treating war injured patients during the Second Gulf War (1990). He has been promoting the use of Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) for more than thirty years in which he is a World Leader. Furthermore, he is an international expert on trauma experimental methodology developing novel clinically relevant animal models. Establishing experimental surgical research in Auckland University, New Zealand, has led to a strong successful PhD Program.  

He has made major contributions to trauma management, education and research in Kuwait, Sweden, New Zealand, Australia and UAE.  He authored more than 415 publications, presented more than 600 invited lectures and abstracts, and received more than 40 national and international awards. He is serving as the Statistics Editor of World Journal of Emergency Surgery and European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery. 

Cite this article as: Arif Alper Cevik, "How To Analyse Your Study Data," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, December 27, 2021, https://iem-student.org/2021/12/27/how-to-analyse-your-study-data/, date accessed: July 2, 2022

Data Collection

data collection

In this educational series, iEM Education Project interviewed Prof. Fikri Abu-Zidan, a world-renowned expert and researcher on trauma, POCUS, and disaster management. He shares his 40 years of experience as a clinical researcher with the young generation of doctors.

The series name is FUNDAMENTALS OF RESEARCH IN MEDICINE and will include various aspects of research. We hope you will enjoy listening to the advice of Prof. Abu-Zidan.

The tenth episode is “Data Collection”

Professor Fikri Abu-Zidan, the head of the Trauma Group at United Arab Emirates University, is an Acute Care Surgeon who graduated (MD) from Aleppo University (Syria) in 1981 and was awarded the FRCS, Glasgow, Scotland in 1987.  He achieved his PhD in Trauma and Disaster Medicine from Linkoping University (Sweden) in 1995 and obtained his Postgraduate Diploma of Applied Statistics from Massey University (New Zealand) (1999). His clinical experience included treating war injured patients during the Second Gulf War (1990). He has been promoting the use of Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS) for more than thirty years in which he is a World Leader. Furthermore, he is an international expert on trauma experimental methodology developing novel clinically relevant animal models. Establishing experimental surgical research in Auckland University, New Zealand, has led to a strong successful PhD Program.  

He has made major contributions to trauma management, education and research in Kuwait, Sweden, New Zealand, Australia and UAE.  He authored more than 415 publications, presented more than 600 invited lectures and abstracts, and received more than 40 national and international awards. He is serving as the Statistics Editor of World Journal of Emergency Surgery and European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery. 

Cite this article as: Arif Alper Cevik, "Data Collection," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, December 22, 2021, https://iem-student.org/2021/12/22/data-collection/, date accessed: July 2, 2022