iEM Image Feed: Penetrating eye injury

iem image feed

A 42 years old male, presents to the ED 1 hour after he was hammering a nail onto a wooden shelf, where the nail flew and strike his left open eye. In an attempt to help, his friend immediately removed the nail.

After that, he has been having severe sharp pain and blurry vision in his left eye.

On examination, the left eye had poor visual acuity, and he could only perceive light and movement. The pupil was fixed, dilated and non-reactive to light. Right eye examination was normal.

819.2 - eye penetran trauma 2 -siedel sign

Further reading

Cite this article as: iEM Education Project Team, "iEM Image Feed: Penetrating eye injury," in International Emergency Medicine Education Project, April 28, 2021, https://iem-student.org/2021/04/28/iem-image-feed-penetrating-eye-injury/, date accessed: July 4, 2022

Siedel Test

A 42 years old male, presents to the ED 1 hour after he was hammering a nail onto a wooden shelf, where the nail flew and strike his left open eye. In an attempt to help, his friend immediately removed the nail. After that, he has been having severe sharp pain and blurry vision in his left eye. On examination, the left eye had poor visual acuity, and he could only perceive light and movement. The pupil was fixed, dilated and non-reactive to light. Right eye examination was normal.

819.2 - eye penetran trauma 2 -siedel sign
819.1 - eye penetran trauma 1

How would you approach to this patient?

To learn more about it, read chapters below.

Read "Eye Trauma" Chapter

Read "Red Eye" Chapter

Quick Read

Globe rupture

It is an ophthalmologic emergency, consisting of a full-thickness injury in the cornea or sclera caused by penetrating or blunt trauma. Anterior rupture is usually observed, as this is the region where the sclera is the thinnest. Posterior rupture is rare and difficult to diagnose. It can be diagnosed through indirect findings such as contraction in the anterior chamber and decrease in intraocular pressure (IOP) in the affected eye. If there is a risk of globe rupture, a slit lamp test with 10% fluorescein must be conducted. Normal tissue is dark orange under a blue cobalt filter; a lighter color is observed in the damaged zone due to a lower dye concentration. Ultrasonography (USG) can be useful in making a diagnosis, especially with posterior ruptures. Computed tomography (CT) sensitivity ranges 56–75%. In cases of anterior globe injuries, USG use, and if there is a risk of a foreign metal body, magnetic resonance imaging, are contraindicated. Prompt ophthalmology consultation is required. While in the emergency department, tetanus prophylaxis, analgesics, bed rest, head elevation, and systemic antibiotic therapy are required. The most commonly preferred antibiotics are cefazolin and vancomycin. Age over 60 years; injury sustained by assault, on the street/highway, during a fall, or by gunshot; and posterior injuries are indications of a poor prognosis.

Siedel test

Seidel test is used to detect ocular leaks from the globe following injury. If there is penetration to the eye, aqueous leakage happens. However, the fluid is clear and hard to identify. Therefore, non-invasive test “Siedel” is used for better visualization of this leakage. Fluorescein 10% is applied to the injured eye, and the leakage becomes more prominent.

To learn more about it, read chapters below.

Read "Eye Trauma" Chapter

Read "Red Eye" Chapter